Bob Moser

Bob Moser is the executive editor of The American Prospect. He is the former editor of The Texas Observer and author of Blue Dixie: Awakening the South's Democratic Majority. His email is bmoser@prospect.org

Recent Articles

Daily Meme: Kansas Is For Haters

  • Back in the day, if you wanted to locate the quintessence of American intolerance and backwardness, you had to look South—the deeper South, the better. But the Alabamas and Mississippis are now looking relatively fair-minded and rational compared to the nation's new standard-bearer of hatred and stupidity: once-moderate Kansas.
  • This week's lead item from the one-time home of reasonable Republicans like Dwight Eisenhower and Bob Dole: a bill to legalize discrimination against gay couples passed the state house, and will likely soon become law. 

Daily Meme: Biden and the Bidening Bideners

  • Yesterday, Vice President Biden made mini-news by telling CNN he'll announce next summer whether he'll make a third run for the top job: “There may be reasons I don't run," he said, "but there's no obvious reason for me why I think I should not run." 

Daily Meme: Fresh New Fodder for Smug Liberal Superiority

  • As we put-down, put-upon, lovable-losing liberals have been learning for decades now, if you can't win—even in your own party—at least you can revel in reminders of your moral and intellectual superiority. Republicans, bless their hearts, are ever more happy to oblige.

The End of the Solid South

Victor Juhasz

The final rally of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign took place on symbolically charged ground: the rolling fields of Manassas, site of the first major battle of the Civil War. It was the last stop on an election eve spent entirely in the South: Jacksonville, Charlotte, and finally Northern Virginia. In the autumn chill, an estimated 90,000 people spread out across the county fairgrounds and waited for hours to cheer a new president—and a new South.

What Democracy Lost in 2012

Illustrations by John Ritter

Last November 7, a syndicated cartoon made the rounds in progressive circles. Drawn by Signe Wilkinson, it showed a battered, bruised, patched-up Uncle Sam defiantly flexing his biceps and flashing the dazed grin of a fighter who’d survived a vicious knockdown and prevailed in 15 rounds. The caption, “Democracy Wins,” became a popular meme amid the liberal euphoria that broke out on election night. President Barack Obama had been re-elected, Karl Rove had been embarrassed on national television, and the Sheldon Adelsons and National Rifle Associations of the world had thrown hundreds of millions of dollars down the toilet. Voter suppression had not kept blacks and Latinos from the polls. Citizens United had not done its worst. Democracy had been tried and tested, and emerged banged up but miraculously intact.

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