Gabriel Arana

Gabriel Arana is a senior editor at The American Prospect. His articles on gay rights, immigration, and media have appeared in publications including The New Republic, The Nation, Salon, The Advocate, and The Daily Beast.

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Recent Articles

Try to Find the Heritage Foundation's Anti-Immigration Study on its Spanish-Language Site

*/ You'd think, based on the media blitz promoting the conservative Heritage Foundation's recent study—which claims immigration reform will cost the country $6.3 trillion dollars—the organization would be using its full web presence to promote their work. Not so on the think tank's Spanish-language site, Heritage Libertad . Whereas the study, " The Fiscal Cost of Unlawful Immigrants and Amnesty to the U.S. Taxpayer ," is touted at the top of the Heritage Foundation's English-language website with the blazing headline "The Cost of Amnesty to You," on its Spanish-language site the report is buried well below the fold (on my browser, it's two screen-lengths deep). This may all be a coincidence, but with content like " Why Does America Welcome Immigrants? " the site gives the general impression the organization in fact supports immigration reform. "Looking at the Heritage foundation libertad webpage, they put information that gives the impression that they support immigration reform, or...

Why We Still Need GLAAD

Flickr/Steven Damron, Greg Hernandez
Flickr/Steven Damron Sharon Stone at the 2008 GLAAD Media Awards I f journalists threw parties the way they write stories, you'd arrive right on time and the hosts would be scooping used solo cups into the garbage. "Party's over," they'd announce, coaxing you back out the door. Any regular consumer of media will know what I mean: Like a zealous mortician, journalists love to pronounce things dead, especially before they've run their course. Last fall, New York magazine declared Brooklyn "over"; 2010 heralded the "end of men," according to The Atlantic ; and Facebook's been killed off and resurrected by journalists more times than one can count. Last week, it was GLAAD (formerly the Gay Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) 1 1. In March, GLAAD announced it was dropping the full name to more accurately reflect its work on behalf of bisexual and transgender rights. The organization now simply goes by "GLAAD." that got the journo...

On Immigration, Gay Community Should Take One for the Team

Flickr/Phil Davis
In July of 2010, Russ Feingold did the principled thing. After weeks of markup and debate, the liberal Wisconsin senator voted against Dodd-Frank. "My test for the financial-regulatory reform bill is whether it will prevent another crisis," Feingold said at the time. "[The bill] fails that test." Ironically, Feingold's fortitude only served to further weaken the legislation . In order to break a filibuster, Dodd-Frank's sponsors had to appease conservative Massachusetts senator Scott Brown, who opposed a "bank tax" that would have made financial institutions pay for the new regulatory regime. The provision was stripped from the legislation, costing taxpayers $19 billion. Gay-rights advocates should keep this scenario in mind as the Gang of Eight tries to push immigration reform through the Senate. Given that more than a quarter million undocumented immigrants are LGBT , the movement has a broad interest in seeing comprehensive reform with a path to citizenship succeed. But gay-rights...

Are Gay Guys Checking You Out in the Locker Room?

AP Photo/Eric Gay
AP Photo/Eric Gay NBA player Jason Collins, left, in 2009. Collins recently came out as gay in a Sports Illustrated op-ed, the first active player in a major-league sport to do so. A s the first active member of one of the major sports leagues to come out as gay, NBA player Jason Collins’s announcement yesterday has generated praise from gay-rights supporters. Predictably, it has also prompted dire warnings about gays in the locker room from homophobes like the Family Research Council’s Brian Fischer: I will guarantee you ... if the ownership of whatever team is thinking about bringing him back, or thinking about trading for him, and they go to the players on that team and they say 'How do you feel about an out active homosexual being in the same locker room, sharing the same shower facilities with you?' they'll say no way. I don't want that. I do not want some guy, a teammate, eyeballing me in the shower. This seems to be a concern primarily among men—women, for whatever reason, aren...

Five Reasons Boston Has Nothing to Do with Immigration Reform

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
*/ AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on immigration reform yesterday. S hortly after Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev detonated bombs near the finish line at the Boston marathon, killing 3 people and injuring over 200, conservatives opposed to immigration reform began exploiting the tragedy. Their goal? Derailing or delaying the 844-page Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013 . The bombings cast a pall over hearings on the immigration bill in the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday, where Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano fielded questions about the asylum process used by the boys' family to enter the country. Questions were also posed about the Department of Homeland Security's entry-exit system, which tracked the older of the two brothers' six-month trip to Russia, but not his re-entry. Republican senator Rand Paul sent a letter to House...

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