Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the executive editor of The American ProspectHis email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

The Sighted and the Blinkered

(Photo: AP/John Minchillo)
(Photo: AP/John Minchillo) Supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders write comments on a sign following a protest march through downtown Philadelphia on July 24. T here comes a time in the life of all revolutions when circumstance erodes solidarity, when cracks, splits, and factions emerge. As anyone who’s been watching the Democratic Convention can attest, that time has come to the Sanders Revolution. The factions this time around aren’t Bolsheviks and Mensheviks. They’re more like the Realos (realists) and Fundis (fundamentalists) who fought each other in Germany’s Green Party once the party began to win some power. That’s not a bad way to describe the two wings of Sandersism, though the Sighted and the Blinkered might do as well. The circumstance that most erodes solidarity in a successful revolution is qualified success, which invariably brings with it some power and some compromise. By staying in the race to press for changes to the Democratic Party’s platform and rules—and more...

Trump's Dystopia

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump, speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. “ I have visited the laid-off factory workers and the communities crushed by our horrible and unfair trade deals,” Donald Trump said last night. “These are the forgotten men and women of our country. People who work hard but no longer have a voice. “I AM YOUR VOICE.” Those words were capitalized in the written text of Trump’s acceptance speech. That all-caps sentence was meant to be a big deal. And so it is. Franklin Roosevelt spoke up about “the forgotten man” during his 1932 campaign, in a time when the nation really had plunged into the kind of abyss that Trump spent well over an hour last night trying to convince his listeners is back again. But Roosevelt never claimed that he was his supporters’ voice. Nor did Lincoln or Washington. “I have joined the political arena so that the powerful can no longer beat...

Boos for Cruz

(Sipa via AP Images)
(Sipa via AP Images) Delegates react as Ted Cruz speaks on day three of the Republican National Convention. D ay Three of Donald Trump’s convention has come and gone, and we have already seen two unplanned disruptions the likes of which hadn’t visited the GOP since its uproarious Goldwater Convention of 1964. On Monday afternoon, Ted Cruz’s delegates booed and shouted so loudly after they lost their fight to change the convention rules that the party chairman left the stage and the proceedings ground to a halt. Last night, as it became clear that Cruz would not conclude his speech to the delegates with a Trump endorsement, Trump’s delegates all but booed him off the stage. Maybe this is what happens when Republicans abruptly shift course, as they did in ’64 and as they’re doing today. When the GOP takes a radically new direction, all hell breaks loose. In ’64, a party that had been dominated by moderate Eastern elites, friendly to civil rights and even resigned to living with unions,...

Citizen Trump

AP Photo/Evan Vucci
AP Photo/Evan Vucci Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention, Monday, July 18, 2016, in Cleveland. T he theme of Night Two of the Republican Convention was “Make America Work Again,” but the jobs that the delegates plainly wished to create were jailers’ –the guys who would “Lock her up.” The “her,” if you’ve been orbiting Jupiter and have missed the reduction of the Republican Party to a communal hate-fest, was Hillary Clinton. “Lock her up” was the delegates’ shouted refrain in response to New Jersey Governor’s Chris Christie’s “indictment” of Clinton for crimes against America (crimes so horrible, in fact, that they actually didn’t happen). This is, so far, the “Lock Her Up” convention. Republicans have spent more time vilifying, defaming, and demonizing Clinton (literally demonizing—Ben Carson twice linked her to Lucifer) than they have extolling Donald Trump. Any articulation of a Republican program, meanwhile, has been almost entirely...

The Trump Show is Trapped in Time

Republicans have launched their convention with dire warnings that no longer ring true, and with empty-headed attacks on a more diverse, cosmopolitan and liberal nation.

Sputnik via AP
Sputnik via AP Donald Trump speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. W hat time is it? What year is it? The first night of Donald Trump’s convention suggested we were back in an earlier age, when crime was rampant, fear stalked the cities, and good people hunkered down in their homes and prayed the storm would pass. “The vast majority of Americans do not feel safe,” Rudy Giuliani grimly announced, before proclaiming that Trump would restore order in America as he, Rudy (thumping his chest to make sure you understood he meant himself), had in New York. Never mind that serious crime has fallen by a quarter since 2006, and had been halved in the decade preceding. Dangers lurk everywhere. To prove the point, Trump’s handlers produced three parents of sons killed by undocumented immigrants. Two were killed in auto accidents, however, and with more than 30,000 Americans killed in such accidents every year, it’s hard to argue on the basis of two cases that the undocumented...

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