Jaime Fuller

Jaime Fuller is a former associate editor at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Worst Inauguration Ever!

Many a president has felt obligated to begin his inaugural address by noting how wonderful it is that in America, the transition of power from one leader to another is accomplished not by force of arms but with a peaceful ceremony, albeit one requiring thousands of people to stand in the cold for hours, for which they are rewarded with a patriotic number from the likes of Kelly Clarkson. There are a few notes any inaugural address will hit: America is terrific, and its people are darn special; these are important times; we have come far, yet many challenges lie ahead. But to hear Republicans talk today, you'd think that after he got all that out of the way, Barack Obama took off his glove, smacked John Boehner across the face with it, then set fire to a photo of Saint Ronnie of Rancho del Cielo. The folks complaining today (see below) are the same people who on the evening of Obama's inauguration four years ago held a dinner at which it was decided that they should proceed into this...

Hardball Works

It would be easy to gloat over the fact that Republicans backed down (sort of) from their threat to cripple the American economy by destroying the full faith and credit of the United States government if they don't get everything they want. True, they didn't withdraw their debt-ceiling threat, they just said they're going to put it off for three months. But we can give them a bit of credit for stepping back and realizing that they were acting like a bunch of crazy people. It's a sign of the times that when congressional Republicans announce that they'll put off intentionally tanking the American economy for an entire 90 days, we react as though reason and sanity have finally returned to Washington. The bill that Speaker Boehner will allow to the floor of the House for a vote will also include a provision withholding pay for members of Congress unless the Senate passes a budget in that time. Gimmicky? Sure? Unconstitutional? Yep. (The 27 th Amendment mandates that changes to Congress'...

Don't Worry, We Love Guns

In case you were wondering how many shotguns Joe Biden has, the answer is two, a 20-gauge and a 12-gauge. That's what he told the U.S. Conference of Mayors today, though his audience was that larger group of Americans looking for reassurance that the Vice President is indeed a gun-totin' man. Or perhaps no one was looking for such reassurance, but he gave it to them anyway. The administration's plan to contain gun violence now moves toward the legislative arena, where its prospects are uncertain at best. The emerging consensus has it that the component of the plan with the greatest chance of making it through Congress is the expansion of the FBI background-check system. Today, background checks are only required for purchases at licensed gun dealers (of which there are 130,000 in America; compare that to the nation's 144,000 gas stations). As Biden said, requiring you to "take another 20 minutes and go to Dick's Sporting Goods" if you want to buy a gun from your neighbor strikes most...

We're Not There Yet on Guns

Guns have killed more than 900 Americans since December 14, 2012. The shocking statistic seems powerful enough on its own to prompt the type of action seen in President Obama's gun-control announcement today. And yet the 23 executive actions and legislative laundry list—gun reform of a size not seen since 1968—were not motivated by the thousands of gun deaths the United States tallies every year alone. No, the only time our nation grapples with our curious and well-documented history of violence is when the magnitude of tragedy is condensed into a moment, such as the shooting that happened at Sandy Hook Elementary the morning of December 14. As Obama gave his remarks today, four children stood behind him, each only a few years older than the 20 kids whose lives were snuffed out that morning in Newtown, Connecticut, and a visceral reminder of why we need to tackle gun-control legislation now. The 900 dead since Newtown, though? Obama only mentioned them in passing while he spent...

Democrats' New Litmus Issue?

One of the clearest signs of how the gun issue has been transformed since the massacre in Newtown is that two probable Democratic presidential candidates in 2016, New York governor Andrew Cuomo and Maryland governor Martin O'Malley, have come out in the past few days with proposals for significant restrictions on guns, something that just a short time ago many in the party would have considered the height of political foolishness. And only two days into its 2013 session, the state legislature in New York has already passed a measure banning certain military-style guns and ammunition clips with over seven rounds, expanding registration requirements, and requiring background checks for anyone buying ammunition and for private gun sales. While there's no way to know what the political landscape will look like three years from now, at the moment it seems possible that support for strong gun control (or "gun safety" or "gun-violence prevention," if you prefer) measures could become a...

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