Jaime Fuller

Jaime Fuller is a former associate editor at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Wall Street's New BFF

Today, POLITICO had a big scoop : Wall Street has a huge crush on Mitt Romney. Surprising news, to be sure, especially given the candidate’s propensity to name drop his business experience when discussing any policy issue, his distaste for regulation, and the many corporate conglomerates Romney considers allies. The more startling news in the article is the numbers: The Romney camp is outraising Obama among financial-sector donors $37 million to nearly $5 million. That’s a 7-to-1 margin, and 19 of the top donors supported the Democratic ticket in 2008. This is more scary news for the Obama campaign, recently hobbled by May fundraising numbers and a seemingly perpetual inability to call rich liberal donors into action—and more than a little ironic given that Zachary Goldfarb reported at the end of 2011 that “During Obama’s tenure, Wall Street has roared back, even as the broader economy has struggled.” That wasn’t the only news on the campaign front that strikes another point in Romney...

Eye on the Long View

Obama hasn’t had the sunniest of weeks on the policy or campaign front. Jobs numbers are falling and he said some poorly chosen words at a campaign event last week. But while Obama’s economic legacy is being crafted at a mile a minute, his foreign-policy legacy is being chiseled into the marble more slowly, as his supporters, detractors, and observers try to work out whether his administration's achievements thus far are works of greatness or unsalvageable breaches of civil liberties. And, as George Packer noted today : “If Obama loses—a possibility that’s become the wisdom of the week—I think he’ll be remembered most for his foreign-policy achievements. And if he wins, the same will be true, except that he’ll have a chance of being a great foreign-policy President.” All in all, this is a strange set of affairs for a president who ran in 2008 mainly on his ambitious domestic-policy agenda—and who’s fate in November rests almost solely on the state of the economy over the upcoming...

All Local Politics Are National

After what seems like forever, it’s finally Wisconsin Recall Eve. Regardless of what happens tomorrow, one thing’s certain: If you’ve had any doubts about the growing nationalization of elections, wash them away now. All politics may be local, but people in D.C.—whether journalists, politicians, or billionaire dilettantes—have found that they can have an outsized influence on the national stage by investing in state and local races. The recall election has proved to be the most expensive in Wisconsin’s history— $30.5 million coming from outside groups—and although locals have insisted time and time again that “It's a Wisconsin-specific moment, not a national referendum,” 80 percent (rough approximation) of news coverage on Monday will focus on the national implications of the race—even though this is not a referendum on President Obama. There is one real big-picture implication. The Wisconsin recall election’s transmogrification into a national circus over the past year will affect...

What's Next for Economic Policy?

Today's Balance Sheet

It's three days after the dismal May jobs report, and now that politicians are done trying to frame those 69,000 jobs added in their favor, it's time for them to figure our how to get the economic ball rolling again . Although the Federal Reserve has doggedly refused to change course lately, the new jobs numbers may force the institution into action—actions Fed Chair Ben Bernanke may unveil when he testifies in front of Congress on Thursday. One of the most foreboding things weighing on the United States' recovery is the euro crisis, which could be sent roiling if the Greek elections in two weeks bring in a coalition dead-set on opposing German chancellor Angela Merkel's iron-clad austerity policies. Regardless of what happens in the near future, the economy does not seem likely to get out of its funk pre-November, which means high unemployment and a dicey market at least until 2013—and a close presidential election. The Latest Congress Sets its Sights on Conventions POLITICO...

As Wisconsin Goes...

Only five more days till the Wisconsin recall, and surprisingly—given Governor Scott Walker’s advantage thus far on the money and polling front—it looks like it’s going to be a tight match. But as exciting as the race will be, that doesn’t mean it’s time to crown it the Great Predictor of the 2012 Presidential Election. This isn’t a referendum on President Obama, and the petri dish of local politics on display in Wisconsin isn’t translatable to the national level in the way political journalists and commentators want it to be. However, there is one way the Wisconsin recall can be seen as the pre-party to November. If Democrat Tom Barrett squeaks out a victory, there’s a persuasive argument to be made that all the big money being funneled into conservative super PACs and groups by Mary Poppins-pocketed billionaires doesn't necessarily determine the outcome. Democrats have been scared by the prospect of being outspent on races all across the board thanks to the heavy lifting of Karl...

Pages