Jaime Fuller

Jaime Fuller is a former associate editor at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Must Be the Money

The GOP candidates who made it through the invisible primary (the months before any vote has taken place but contenders campaign like crazy) and lasted through Florida can thank super PACs, the shadowy political action committees that can take unlimited donations from corporations and rich donors. Once the primary ends and the general election showdown begins, get ready for super PAC spending and donations to skyrocket for both parties. After yesterday’s Federal Election Commission filing deadline, we can now attach concrete numbers and faces to the dark money fueling the 2012 election. Here’s the scoop on the super PACs you should keep an eye on for the rest of the race (we'll be updating with more stats throughout the day). Priorities USA Log in or register to post comments Candidate : Barack Obama Total Raised 2011 : $4.4 million Percent donations of $25,000 or more : 99 percent Spending in South Carolina (according to ProPublica figures) : $96,555 (all on ads opposing Mitt Romney...

Romney Wins a Double Header

Mitt Romney, who had a resounding victory in last night's Florida primary, also wins the unofficial award for most frightening super PAC. A Federal Election Commission release Tuesday revealed that pro-Romney super PAC "Restoring Our Future" raised over $30 million last year and spent $14 million on campaign ads for the first few crucial primaries. By way of comparison, the super PACs of all the other GOP candidates spent a combined $12 million, and the candidates' campaigns have spent a total of $20.7 million. According to Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Romney's campaign has spent more on negative ads than John McCain spent during his entire presidential bid. We're only a month into the primary season, so expect post-Citizens United super PACs—which give an outsized level of influence to rich donors and corporations—to wreak even more havoc as the stakes get higher after the conventions. The Latest U.S. Deficit to Top $1 trillion, Smallest Since ’09 The...

The Fairness Doctrine

Today's Balance Sheet: Obama laid out his economic message for the election in last night's State of the Union address.

President Barack Obama delineated his campaign message in last night's State of the Union address. Positioning himself as a populist alternative to Mitt Romney and the 1 percent, Obama spent the beginning of his speech laying out his economic plan for the year: "We need to change our tax code so that people like me, and an awful lot of Members of Congress, pay our fair share of taxes," he said. He recommended that the Buffett Rule—which would make it so millionaires can't pay less than 30 percent in taxes—be put in place. Underscoring his economic platform—which also touched on job creation, energy independence, deficit reduction, and trade—was the theme of fairness. "We can either settle for a country where a shrinking number of people do really well while a growing number of Americans barely get by, or we can restore an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, and everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same set of rules," Obama said. The Latest European Central...

Yes We Can ... Watch Something Else

Obama gave his 2012 State of the Union address last night, and all the eyes in the media and political world were tuned in. During the address, 766,681 SOTU-centric tweets were fired off , with 548 coming from inside the chamber. Despite the frenzy that takes over news rooms and congressional offices, the rest of the nation was more likely watching The Real Housewives of Atlanta or Wizards of Waverly Place . Ever since cable started competing with the networks for the hearts of the American public, ratings for primetime presidential addresses have plummeted, as shown by research conducted by Matthew A. Baum and Samuel Kernel of Harvard and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Richard Nixon—not known for the most stirring rhetoric outside of defending questionable pet gifts—had 59 percent of households with televisions watch a routine press conference he gave in 1969. In 2010, Obama only had 41 percent of households watch him give the most important presidential...

How the Other Half Banks

Today's Balance Sheet: Mitt Romney makes beaucoup bucks.

Mitt Romney released his tax returns today, revealing that he made a combined $42.6 million in 2010 and 2011, mostly through capital gains. Because the bulk of his wealth was made through investment, Romney only paid $6.2 million in taxes, which translates into a 13.9 percent tax rate in 2010 and an estimated 15.4 percent rate in 2011. Those rates place him in the same tax bracket as a couple making $70,000 a year. Romney's taxed income was mostly held in a blind trust, with an undisclosed amount held in the Grand Caymans and other overseas financial institutions (including a Swiss bank account that was closed in 2010 after an investment advisor said it could become politically embarrassing). Comparatively, President Barack Obama paid a 25 percent tax rate, and Newt Gingrich paid 31 percent on his income. None of Romney's earnings—$21.7 million in 2010 and $20.9 million last year—came from wages, which is the primary source of income for most people in the U.S. "I pay all the taxes...

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