Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Playing Politics With Policy.

The big news to come out of Labor Day was President Obama 's plan for a $50 billion government investment aimed at upgrading roads, rail, and airport runways over the next six years. This is a good idea, and on the whole, should have a net stimulative effect on the economy, though not by much. Of course, there's also zero chance that this will survive Congress; conservative Democrats will voice their "concerns" about the deficit, and Senate Republicans will showboat about spending and taxes before condemning the plan to death by filibuster. As Steve Benen pointed out , soon-to-be Speaker John Boehner has already given us a taste of the Republican spin on Obama's proposal: House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio Monday criticized President Barack Obama's proposal to boost infrastructure investment as more stimulus spending doomed to fail. "As the American people, facing near double-digit unemployment, mark Labor Day by asking, where are the jobs, the White House has chosen to...

Young Voters Are Still Really Liberal.

( Damon Winter/The New York Times ) Paul Waldman already tackled this, but it's worth adding a few more words on this new Pew survey showing declining Democratic identification among young voters: Self-identification figures for Democrats — in national polls asking young people what party they lean more toward — peaked at 62 percent in July 2008, according to the Pew Research Center. By late last year, the number had dropped eight percentage points, to 54 percent, though researchers saw an uptick earlier this year, back to 57 percent. Republican gains roughly mirrored Democratic losses. Since young voters tend to sit out midterm elections, these numbers aren't very good for the immediate short term. But taking the long view, is this actually indicative of a real trend? Fewer young people identify as Democrats, but in terms of ideology, has anything actually changed? The short answer is no. According to the full Pew survey , "millenial" voters are still much less likely to hold...

The Obama Tax Cuts.

If Republicans retake the majority, which they probably will, their first move will be to extend the Bush tax cuts: "Well, we're going to stay focused on Election Day. But I think before that, we're going to continue to demand that this administration and this Congress make it clear that no American will see a tax increase in January of next year," Pence said during an appearance on CNBC. "So the first thing that we will do is try to preserve the tax relief of 2001 and 2003 for all Americans — for all small businesses and family farmers. But we also want to look at the kind of across-the-board tax relief, the kind of tax relief that will encourage capital formation, to get this economy moving again," the Indiana Republican and potential presidential candidate added. Of course, we're not exactly "extending" the Bush tax cuts. It's more accurate to say that we're going to inaugurate a new round of tax cuts following the mandated expiration of the previous tax cuts. Not that pointing out...

Breaching FDR's Fortress, Cont.

At Daily Kos, blogger Hunter takes issue with my claim that "conservatives haven't really changed the guiding assumptions of American governance": Saying "the conservative movement hasn't really changed the guiding assumptions of American governance or stopped the expansion of the welfare state" isn't just not true, it's a ridiculous statement. It's a bit past ridiculous, in fact. The conservative movement hasn't changed guiding assumptions of American governance? Really? What channels has this person been watching? As has been pointed out countless times in countless outlets, the policies of Ronald Reagan himself are now considered too liberal for him to survive in modern GOP politics. Ditto Buckley. Ditto David Frum. Ditto Bob Bennett. John McCain, the ex-presidential candidate of the Republican Party, had to launch himself into loony-land to survive a primary attempt mounted against him. Two facts are in the way of Hunter's rebuttal. First, it's simply the case that conservative...

The Perriello Experiment.

In the latest Survey USA poll of Virginia's 5th District, Rep. Tom Perriello trails his Republican opponent, state Sen. Robert Hurt , by more than 25 points: A new poll in the 5th District Congressional race continues to show a commanding lead for Republican challenger Robert Hurt. Compared to an identical survey six weeks ago, Hurt has increased his lead over Democratic incumbent Tom Perriello by three points. If the election were held Thursday, the News7 SurveyUSA poll indicates that Hurt would defeat Perriello 61 percent to 35 percent. Perriello's tenure as the representative of the 5th District has been something of a test case: Could an unabashedly liberal congressperson survive in a conservative district? Conventional wisdom is for marginal representatives to position themselves against Washington and vote against party priorities whenever the opportunity presented itself. Perriello took the opposite approach; he voted his liberal beliefs and then took the case to the district,...

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