Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Voters Don't Like Republicans Either.

Generally, Republicans have been pretty enthusiastic about the fact that voters aren't too hot on President Obama or the Democratic Party. But they also tend to confuse voter disapproval of Obama for voter approval of Republicans. Of course, the fact is that voters don't particularly like Republicans, either. In a new poll , Public Policy Polling found of people who voted for Barack Obama in 2008 but don't approve of his job performance, few have anything positive to say about the most prominent Republican contenders for the 2010 presidential nomination. Among these voters, Mitt Romney 's unfavorability/favorability is 32/31, Newt Gingrich 's is 32/40, Mike Huckabee 's is 20/39 and Sarah Palin 's is 33/63. This is in line with results from a recent Washington Post /ABC poll, where 29 percent of Americans said they didn't trust congressional Republicans at all. Hostility toward Democrats simply hasn't translated into support for Republicans or their agenda, and the GOP risks damaging...

Marco Rubio's Debt-Ridden Plan.

Like most Republicans, Florida Senate hopeful Marco Rubio has taken to attacking President Obama on debt and deficits. Rubio hit Obama on the deficit in a June interview with Newsmax, and on the "Cutting Government Spending" section of his website, Rubio promised to support measures that would "control the excessive and wasteful spending in Washington that threatens to leave future generations with crushing debt." To that end, Rubio recently released his 12-point plan to "Grow Our Economy." Among other things, Rubio's plan would permanently extend the Bush tax cuts, cut taxes on American businesses, end the estate tax, reform the alternative minimum tax, and repeal the Affordable Care Act. After reading through the plan, I decided to see if his debt-cutting prescriptions would meet the goal set in a recent report by the Peterson-Pew commission. In the report, the commission pushes policy-makers to stabilize the federal debt at 60 percent of GDP by 2018 in order to avoid a genuine...

Represent! Represent!

Adam Serwer mentioned this on his blog, but today, President Obama endorsed Tennessee Democrat Steve Cohen. Cohen is the only white U.S. House member to represent a majority-black district and has been the target of race-based attacks from challengers. In 2008, former Harold Ford aide Nikki Tinker tried to race-bait her way to a primary win with a campaign that basically argued Cohen's race was the reason to oppose him. This year, Cohen is facing a challenge from former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton , and like Tinker before him, Herenton is pushing the view that Cohen's race makes him a poor representative: His opponent in next month's Democratic primary, former Memphis mayor Willie Herenton, even refers to the lack of racial diversity in Tennessee's congressional delegation on his campaign Web site. A page titled "This Picture Looks Better" includes a photo of Herenton alongside the state's all-white delegation. Of course, this is nonsense. As someone from a heavily black and...

Bill Clinton's Still Got It.

(Flickr/ sskennel ) CNN reports that Democrats plan to deploy former President Bill Clinton at every opportunity as midterm campaigning ramps up and Democrats seek to build momentum in swing states where President Obama isn't particularly popular. Already, Democratic strategists plan to use Clinton in his home state of Arkansas, where Sen. Blanche Lincoln faces a tough re-election battle against Congressman John Boozman , and Kentucky, where Democratic nominee Jack Conway is facing off against Tea Party favorite Rand Paul . Clinton's continued popularity is a factor in this decision, but it's also the case that his presidency fits into the narrative Obama is trying to establish for fall's elections: Like Clinton, Obama is only trying to clean up after years of Republican management. To be honest, I've never been a huge admirer of the Clinton administration, but I have always been impressed by Clinton's performance on the campaign trail. Not only is he a tireless campaigner, but he can...

Does the House of Representatives Need More Members?

An interesting find from The New York Times ' Peter Baker : The Supreme Court is being asked to decide whether the House of Representatives should be enlarged to produce a fairer distribution of political power. ... A group of voters appealed to the court after a special three-judge panel in Mississippi last week rejected their lawsuit seeking to at least double the number of seats in the House in the interest of evening out the sizes of Congressional districts. The disparity in size isn't actually that great; most districts fall in the 600,000 to 800,000 range, with only a few dozen districts exceeding or falling below that range. Indeed, most advocates for enlarging the House are less concerned with the population disparity between districts than with the sheer size of each district. As of the 2000 census, the average House member represented approximately 646,000 people. By contrast, when the House first froze its size in the decade following the 1910 census, the average member...

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