Joel Anderson

Joel Anderson is better known in the blogosphere and Twitterverse as blackink12 of PostBourgie. He is currently a newspaper reporter in Florida and has worked at several news organizations, including The Associated Press, for nearly a decade.

Recent Articles

TAP Talks Treme: Smoke My Peace Pipe

A different look at what housing projects mean, our mostly fruitless search for sympathetic institutional figures, and Davis walks the friends-with-benefits line.

Tim Fernholz : It's nice to see Creighton actually teaching and appearing to accomplish his task well, even if he carries on with the usual polemic. It's a much more impressive setting for his arguments than his house. Alexandra Gutierrez : I wonder if there's any connection between Creighton and Billy Sothern. The same Lafcadio Hearn letter that Creighton read to his class opens Sothern's book Down in New Orleans: Reflections from a Drowned City , which recounts what happened to the city after the storm -- basically the same project as Treme . Sothern is a lawyer who has written a lot on the post-Katrina prison crisis (you all should check out this Nation piece he did if you have time), and so his work feels sort of halfway between Creighton's and Toni's. Aminatou Sow : Why is Creighton being such an ass? I cannot help but be reminded how this show is so distinct from The Wire due to these AMAZING women. TF : Pleased to see more explication of the baggage-claim band. Seeing Antoine...

<i>TAP</i> Talks <i>Treme</i>: Shame and Shallow Water

Davis pulls a John Mayer, hope for Annie, and why the women of NOLA are more impressive than the men.

(HBO)
Joel Anderson : As my wife said, any conversation that starts with "Hey, white boy" is bound to end terribly. Davis is really lucky he walked out of there with only a busted mouth. Aminatou Sow : Davis pulled a John Mayer! He absolutely deserved that punch and maybe now he'll finally learn to be a good neighbor. JA : Maybe it's a wake-up call for him because, really, I had to rewind the DVR when I watched that scene. I couldn't believe he felt that comfortable. And it's telling that no one came to his defense. Because really, there is no defense for that. Alexandra Gutierrez : The neighbor's response was one of the realer moments of a mostly unreal episode. Davis' neighbors have already proved that they're as authentic as Davis is -- and given what a low bar that is to clear, they're probably more authentic. Here, they proved to Davis how truly invested in the community they are. "You guys brought me in," says Davis, half hungover and half shocked. "We're your neighbors." Exactly. And...

TAP Talks Treme: At the Foot of Canal Street

This week's bad guys, the appeal of idealistic European musicians, and bets are on that Mardi Gras is the season finale.

Tim Fernholz : I found this to be the most interesting week of Treme thus far -- these characters are starting to become a lot more interesting. Who else is excited about Davis' musically inspired Council bid? In fact, to touch on a theme we've been developing, maybe we're starting to see some cracks in the nameless/faceless institutions versus Our Quirky Heroes narrative. It started with the insurance employee telling Albert that he drinks himself to sleep, and maybe it is continuing with Davis' new-found interest in politics. A nagging question since last episode has been about the New Orleans Police Department. I understand how Illinois National Guardsman are not going to have the best understanding of New Orleans traditions, but seeing these (presumably from New Orleans) police officers acting up makes me wonder about who they are -- are they from New Orleans? What's their take on what's happening to the city? Joel Anderson : It'd be nice to meet more law-enforcement agents and...

TAP Talks Treme: Right Place, Wrong Time

The social hierarchy of musicians, shades of Shake the Devil Off, and can there be good disaster tourism?

Joel Anderson : I think the third episode was the best so far. Which isn't a surprise. And I'm liking Antoine (Wendell Pierce) a lot more than I thought I would, mostly because it's bound to be fun -- or at least interesting -- wherever he turns up. Still not sure that I was ready to get that familiar with his hindquarters, though. Aminatou Sow : "I brought beignets. ... Who you fuckin'?" Phyllis Montana LeBlanc [who plays Antoine's girlfriend] for the win! And Pierce deserves an award for his facial expressions in that opening scene. Strong, beautiful episode. And so quotable! "You do not motherfuck the National Guard." The comic relief provided when Toni (Melissa Leo) bails Davis (Steve Zahn) out of jail is in direct contrast with the gravitas of Antoine's police-brutality episode and subsequent imprisonment. Well done, David Simon! I, too, now despise NOPD. JA : Right on. I think, finally, Treme is coming together for some of those viewers who were disappointed by the first two...

<i>TAP</i> Talks <i>Treme</i>: Meet de Boys on the Battlefront

The problem with white do-gooders, what really happened with Albert and the burglar, and how Treme offers the strongest class narrative since Roseanne.

Joel Anderson : True story: Everyone from Louisiana puts hot sauce on everything. Aminatou Sow : Welcome back to Glee: Bayou Edition . I love how they just casually dropped "mulâtresse." Alexandra Gutierrez : Given that Coco Robicheaux tossed that line off while sacrificing a chicken on live radio, I'm not even sure that was the most notable part of his cameo. Tim Fernholz : The authenticity battle commences in earnest: Who has more symbolic credibility, Iraq veterans or Katrina veterans? That little note about FEMA funding leading prisons to hold on to prisoners to attract subsidies is classic David Simon: Well-meaning incentives that warp institutions, leading to bad outcomes. It's why his politics are so hard to classify: While his topic here leans toward the concerns of the left, the observation about the prisoners is classic conservative public-choice economics. The SBA loans mentioned by the restaurant owner ring true, too; when I interviewed Russell Honore (the Army general who...

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