Monica Potts

Monica Potts is a senior writer for The American Prospect and a fellow with the New America Foundation Asset Building Program. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, the Connecticut Post and the Stamford Advocate. She also blogs at PostBourgie.

Recent Articles

Walking Away From Bad Debts.

Two gigantic real estate companies, Tishman Speyer Properties and BlackRock Realty, that bought the last sizable chunk of middle-class housing in Manhattan are walking away from the failed project and turning the properties over to their creditors: The surrender of the properties, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, ends a tortured real estate saga that saw the partnership make expensive improvements to the complex and then try to rent the apartments at higher market rates in a real estate boom. But a real estate downturn and the city’s strong rent protections hindered those efforts, leaving the buyers scrambling to make payments on loans due for the properties, which have been a comfortable harbor for the city’s middle class since they opened in the late 1940s. “We have spent the last few weeks negotiating in good faith to restructure the debt and ownership of Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village,” said the statement by the partnership. “Over the last few days, however, it has...

Poverty on the Rise in Suburbs.

The Brookings Institution released a new report this week finding that poverty rose fastest in 2008 in suburbs, particularly in suburban and urban areas in the midwest. It also found that more Americans are now low-income, hovering just above the poverty line. Over the course of this decade, two economic downturns translated into a significant rise in poverty, nationally and in many of the country’s metropolitan and non-metropolitan communities. Suburbs saw by far the greatest growth in their poor population and by 2008 had become home to the largest share of the nation’s poor. These trends are likely to continue in the wake of the latest downturn, given its toll on traditionally more suburbanized industries and the faster pace of growth in suburban unemployment. This ongoing shift in the geography of American poverty increasingly requires regional scale collaboration by policymakers and social service providers in order to effectively address the needs of a poor population that is...

Trusting Women to Disregard this Ad.

As I'm sure almost everyone knows by now, 2007 Heisman trophy winner Tim Tebow is taking to the airwaves with his mom during the Super Bowl so that they can tell everyone about how she disregarded the advice of her doctors and risked death to give birth to the Football Messiah. Focus on the Family, the Christian group paying for the ad, hasn't released the details of what the life-affirming message will contain, but the Gainesville Sun let us know about the tale of Tim's mama and her fifth child. Just before her pregnancy, Pam fell into a coma after contracting amoebic dysentery, a bacteria transmitted through contaminated drinking water. During her recovery, she received a series of strong medications. And even though she discontinued the regimen when she discovered the pregnancy, doctors told Pam the fetus had been damaged. Doctors later told Pam that her placenta had detached from the uterine wall, a condition known as placental abruption, which can deprive the fetus of oxygen and...

Scott Brown, Super Star.

The Christian Science Monitor tells us that Scott Brown is signing is autographs with "41," but also that he's open to working with Democrats too. He has an independent record in Massachusetts," says campaign adviser Eric Fehrnstom. "He knows how to work with the other side. Brown says that he wants to serve on Senate Armed Services, Homeland Security, and the Appropriations Committee. He campaigned on ending business as usual in Washington. Asked how he plans to do it, he said: I've already changed business as usual, just by being the 41st senator," he says, on his out the door to catch his daughter Ayla’s basketball game. "Now every [Republican] senator is the 41st senator. It’s bringing greater transparency and accountability in government, just because I’m here. Who knows what on Earth that's supposed to mean. But we can either take a moment to bemoan the short memories of the American people -- who actually thinks that the short-lived Democratic supermajority was business as...

Massachusetts Wasn't a Wake Up Call on Jobs.

Among the many memes to crop up after the Massachusetts victory of Republican Scott Brown -- the Cassandra-like calls that health care is doomed, the Democrats were too progressive, the Democrats were not progressive enough -- is that the special election was a wake-up call to focus on jobs instead of health care. From the Associated Press story: Wounded in Massachusetts, frustrated Democrats on Wednesday urged the White House to focus on jobs and the economy - not the health care overhaul that's now at risk - and pressed President Barack Obama to more forcefully make their case against Republicans ahead of potentially disastrous elections this fall. On the day after the improbable Senate election of Republican Scott Brown in Massachusetts, Obama and his Democratic Party raced to re-evaluate their midterm election strategy, adjust their health care approach and assuage an angry electorate. The embarrassing defeat to the GOP in a Democratic stronghold was a bitter end to the president'...

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