Monica Potts

Monica Potts is a freelance writer, and former staff member of The American Prospect. A fellow with the New America Foundation Asset Building Program, her work has appeared in The New York Times, the Connecticut Post and the Stamford Advocate. She also blogs at PostBourgie.

Recent Articles

Dodd to Retire.

Dodd's not running again! And people are shocked! Josh Marshall at Talking Points Memo thought Dodd's seat was ultimately safe until he retired, and I have to admit that when I worked in Connecticut, I thought so as well. The Associated Press reports that Connecticut's popular Attorney General, Richard Blumenthal , will run to replace Dodd. Blumenthal had reportedly been contemplating a run for Sen. Joseph Lieberman 's spot in 2012, and now gets a chance two years earlier. Ken Dixon , a Hartford reporter for Hearst's newspapers in Connecticut, has already pretty much called it for Blumenthal. He predicts that might open up the crowded 2010 governor's race by luring folks to run for Connecticut's AG spot. Adam Raymond at the Daily Beast thinks Dodd's departure is better for the Democrats than that of Byron Dorgan of North Dakota. While Democrats might have a tough time holding onto Dodd's spot, they could be lucky in avoiding a throw-down between Dodd and possible a Republican Senate...

You Only Thought That Felt Nice.

Yesterday, the BBC published a story about a group of researchers at King's College London who concluded, after asking sets of identical twins whether they had one, that the erogenous zone called the G-spot reportedly enjoyed by some women is merely a myth or a figment of their imaginations. Turning it into a reassuring bit of news, the doctors, one man and two women, counseled that no one should be upset when he or she couldn't find it in his or her partners. Comic takedown by Balk over at the Awl aside, this just seems another way in which the mysteriousness of female sexuality, or the idea that women may lack a sense of sexuality, is codified and medicalized. The history of treating female sexual organs and the pleasure they can provide as the cause of medical problems — this is where hysteria gets it's name— and treating sex with men as a potential cure for those problems goes all the way back to Hippocrates . Hysteria didn't disappear as a diagnosis until the early part of the...

Running Away from the Runaway Problem.

Over the weekend, the New York Times reported that legislators are moving to improve the way social workers and police deal with youth runaways. New laws would change the way police track runaways and increase spending on social services and outreach. Another recognizes the importance of programs for at-risk youth. The move comes partly in response to a Times series in October that included the revelation that police departments nationwide fail to enter missing-persons reports into a national database about 16 percent of the time. The New York Police Department's rate of failure to do so was about 40 percent, according to the Times . That was highlighted in November when a 13-year-old with autism rode the subway system for 11 days despite his parents efforts to report him missing. But the problem, as the Times' original series pointed out , is that parents only file reports in a minority of cases. (A quick aside about a problem with the series, it profiled white teenagers while its...

Spreading Internet Access.

Bloggers and columnists , in the flurry of predictions that come at the start of any new year, are wondering how we'll consume media in 2010. What will be the new Twitter? Will any of it will be enough to save old media outlets? These questions are important, but it's worth remembering that in a vast swath of the United States, residents often don't even have access to sites like Twitter. About two-thirds of Americans have access to broadband Internet in their homes, but in rural areas fewer than 40 percent do, according to a 2008 Pew survey . While the number of rural Americans getting access to Internet connections fast enough to truly consume media online is growing, 15 percent of dial-up users in rural areas said there was no broadband service available to which they could make the switch. More than a third said the price of broadband would have to fall. The same survey says those who are not online are more than twice as likely to be low-income. The stimulus package set aside $7...

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