Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a contributing editor for the Prospect and the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Health-Care Baloney from Mitt Romney

Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, seated, smiles with, clockwise from top, Massachusetts Health and Human Services Secretary Timothy Murphy, Senate President Robert Travaglini, Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and House Speaker Salvatore DiMasi as he signs into law at Faneuil Hall in Boston a landmark bill designed to guarantee virtually all state residents have health insurance, in this Wednesday, April 12, 2006, file photo. While Romney has received positive reviews of the sweeping health care initiative, it will be up to the state's next governor to sort through the details of the law. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
Let me do something weird and discuss a bit about the substance of last night's debate. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in 2006, signing into law a landmark bill designed to guarantee virtually all state residents have health insurance There was some discussion of health care, and of course it was superficial and misleading. That was partly the fault of the candidates, and partly the fault of the moderators, who at one point gave the candidates 30 seconds each to solve America's health-care problems. Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich both reasonably observed that this was kind of absurd. But here's something Romney said: I believe very deeply in the functioning of markets. The work I've done in health care, actually worked as a consultant to the health care industry, to hospitals and various health institutions. I had the occasion of actually acquiring and trying to build health care businesses. I know something about it, and I believe markets work. And what's...

Time to Feel Bad for Rick Perry

One time about ten years ago, I was on a radio program talking about some political matter or other, and I started a point by saying, "There are three reasons why." I then said, "First..." and explained the first. Then I said, "Second..." and explained the second. Then I couldn't remember the third. Fortunately, for this interview I was in the studio, and I looked helplessly at the host and gave her a little shake of the head and an open mouth, the universal signal for, "I just had a brain fart, please help!" Being a smooth professional, she stepped in quickly and moved the conversation along. I learned my lesson: I've done a few hundred radio interviews in the time since and never once have I said a specific number of points I'm about to give. Which is why I have a little bit of sympathy for Rick Perry today: You have to wonder just what went through Perry's head after that "Oops" escaped his mouth. Maybe nothing in particular. Or maybe, "Given the fact that I've been having trouble...

There Is No "Real" Mitt Romney

Peter Beinart has some encouraging words for conservatives worried about a Romney presidency, but this has relevance for liberals too: ...within weeks of Romney's election, his chief of staff would be culling through lists of potential deputy secretaries of the interior. The list would be generated by places like the Heritage Foundation, the American Enterprise Institute, the Cato Institute and Chamber of Commerce. It would consist largely of people who served in the Bush administration, with perhaps a few entrants who stood out at the state level—which is to say, were particularly zealous in serving corporate interests—thrown in. This list would have been approved, if not actually assembled, by the very industries that the Interior Department regulates. It would be similar to the list that would have been assembled for President Perry or President Cain, and it would include no pro-regulation Republicans, because the people who produce such lists are in the anti-regulation business...

Mitt Romney's Public Option

If you want to be a serious presidential candidate, you have to offer just enough detail in your policy proposals that it appears that you're genuinely grappling with the issues, but not so much that you give people too much material with which to find fault. To that end, Mitt Romney has offered a plan that includes the following about Medicare: Medicare should not change for anyone in the program or soon to be in it. Nor should tax hikes be part of the solution. Reforms must honor commitments to our current seniors while giving the next generation an improved program that offers the freedom to choose what their coverage under Medicare should look like: • Give future seniors a choice between traditional Medicare and many other health-care plans offering at least the same benefits • Help seniors pay for the option they choose, with a level of support that ensures all can obtain the coverage they need; provide those with lower incomes with more generous assistance • Allow beneficiaries...

Cain Lurves the Race Card

You want some race card? Well here is some race card: That's not messing around. Note that this is not from the Cain campaign but from "Americans for Herman Cain," a group created to support his candidacy. You've got the testimony from Rush Limbaugh, who knows a thing or two about propagating racial stereotypes, and rather than just invoking Clarence Thomas, they actually show the clip of him talking about his "high-tech lynching." You'll recall that the "lynching" Thomas suffered through was one in which his sexual harassment of Anita Hill was revealed to the world and he was criticized for it, before ascending to his lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court, not one in which he was beaten, burned, and hanged from a tree until he died, but they're pretty much the same thing, right? Anyhow, Cain's supporters will now be portraying him as a similar martyr to venomous racism. But in case you're confused, here's a review of the right's current stance on that topic: 1. The primary...

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