Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility. He writes columns for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe and the New York Times international edition. 

Recent Articles

Donald Trump, Black Lives Matter, and the Power of Disruption

Trump, like BLM, is upsetting business as usual for party leaders. BLM's intervention just happens to be much more constructive. 

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson Marissa Johnson, left, speaks as Mara Jacqueline Willaford stands with her and Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders stands nearby as the two women take over the microphone at a rally Saturday, August 8, 2015, in downtown Seattle. An earlier version of this article appeared at The Huffington Post . I t was a good week for disruptive innovation. Three protestors very loosely affiliated with Black Lives Matter shut down Bernie Sanders yet again , this time at a Seattle rally Saturday afternoon. Meanwhile, Donald Trump escalated his disruptive impact on the Republican presidential field, with a post-debate remark implying that Fox reporter Megyn Kelly was menstruating when she asked him provocative questions, fittingly, about his coarse put-downs of women. The two forms of disruption invite comparison. Protestors invoking BLM are disrupting the most progressive candidate in the Democratic field. Why? Because in the year since the murder of...

Boosting Low Pay

A look inside the Summer 2015 cover package on new fronts in the labor movement.  

AP Photo/Seth Wenig
AP Photo/Seth Wenig Protesters rally for higher pay in front of a McDonald's, Wednesday, April 15, 2015, in New York. W idening inequality in America has its roots in several trends but is driven primarily by unequal earnings. In this package of articles, five authors address the pressure on middle- and working-class income—and strategies for reversing the trend. In a highly original essay, Harold Meyerson assesses the chilling parallels between the role played by the slave South in both the 19th-century global economy and the U.S. political economy—and the similar, wage-depressing influence of the South today. Robots are one more threat to jobs and pay levels. As economist Jeffrey Sachs explains , automation in a laissez-faire economy indeed produces that result. However, with the right public policies, robots can relieve a lot of human toil and spread wealth and leisure. Three companion pieces focus on organizing. They explore the rise of unions in three key sectors, two of them...

The German Menace

Forgetting its history, Germany's obsession with austerity and debt threatens to derail the project of European union. 

Rex Features via AP Images
Rex Features via AP Images Alexis Tsipras and Angela Merkel European Union Emergency Summit, EU Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium, July 12, 2015. This story originally appeared at The Huffington Post . A t the end of World War II, a bloody horror that cost 80 million lives worldwide, American leaders were determined that Germany must never again rise to massacre its neighbors. So the Allies created a plan to strip Germany of its industrial might and turn it into a "pastoral" economy with a GDP well below its level of 1938. In addition, the reparations from the previous damage created by Germany during World War I, which were levied at the Versailles peace conference but never paid, were made due and payable over ten years. The combined cost of the reparations and the loss of its industry were deemed a fitting punishment for the Germans, who pretended not to know what was going on but were fully culpable for the rise and the grotesque atrocities of the Hitler regime. Germany,...

Why Social Security Beats All Rivals -- And the Case for Expanding It

More retirees are relying exclusively on Social Security than ever before. The program itself is sound—but it needs to be expanded. 

AP Photo/Jon Elswick
AP Photo/Jon Elswick The cover page for the summary of the 2015 Status of the Social Security and Medicare Programs released by the Social Security and Medicare Board of Trustees is photographed Thursday, July 23, 2015, in Frederick, Maryland. This article originally appeared at The Huffington Post . T his is the season when we hear calls to cut Social Security. That's because of the annual trustees report on the system's financial condition. Last week, the trustees reported that Social Security can pay all of its projected obligations through about 2034. To keep faith with today's workers and tomorrow's retirees, Social Security will need additional funds, though the shortfall is entirely manageable if we act in the next few years. The report prompted the usual right-wing blarney about cutting benefits or privatizing Social Security, as well as familiar bleatings from billionaire deficit hawks about the need to delay the retirement age for people far less fortunate. One part of the...

Why Liberals Have to Be Radicals

(Photo: AP/Charlie Neibergall)
(Photo: AP/Charlie Neibergall) Democratic presidential candidates stand on stage during the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner on July 17 in Cedar Rapids. From left, Bernie Sanders, Martin O'Malley, Hillary Clinton, and Lincoln Chafee. J ust about nothing being proposed in mainstream politics is radical enough to fix what ails the economy. Consider everything that is destroying the life chances of ordinary people: Young adults are staggered by $1.3 trillion in student debt. Yet even those with college degrees are losing ground in terms of incomes. The economy of regular payroll jobs and career paths has given way to a gig economy of short-term employment that will soon hit four workers in 10. The income distribution has become so extreme, with the one percent capturing such a large share of the pie, that even a $15/hour national minimum wage would not be sufficient to restore anything like the more equal economy of three decades ago. Even the mainstream press acknowledges...

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