Scott Lemieux

Scott Lemieux is an assistant professor of political science at the College of Saint Rose. He contributes to the blogs Lawyers, Guns, and Money and Vox Pop.

Recent Articles

HOW DARE YOU SHOW THE EFFECTS OF MY POLICIES!

HOW DARE YOU SHOW THE EFFECTS OF MY POLICIES! I've been looking forward to this since Friday: Something I didn't photograph, but wished I did: Nation magazine writer Max Blumenthal queued up to get a book signed by Michelle Malkin . When he reached her, however, he didn't produce a book. He produced this photo and asked her to sign it. According to Blumenthal, Malkin got so angry she left the table; video that can prove or disprove this telling should be posted on Monday. And, sure enough, the video's here : For some reason, Malkin is almost as ashamed as pictures of the race-based concentration camps she wrote an entire book defending as some Young Republicans are of their Confederate flag lapels ("What's wrong with the Confederacy?"). There are many more classic comments within; I particularly enjoyed the David Horowitz -- David Horowitz! -- claim that The Left is driven by "anger and resentment." Great work by Blumenthal. -- Scott Lemieux

I BLAME JAMES MADISON.

I BLAME JAMES MADISON. At her other online venue, J. Goodrich has a good discussion of American political culture and its role in the fact that the United States maintains an irrational health care system that provides much narrower coverage for much more money (including more state money) than other comparable liberal democracies. While this is important, I think that the single most important factor (both going forward and going backward) is the institutional structure of American government , with its unusually high number of veto points. In a Westminster system, having Bill Clinton ( or LBJ or Harry Truman ) support national health insurance with a legislative majority is enough to get it done, and such programs are virtually impossible to repeal once enacted. In the American system, you need not just a President who supports it, but a liberal (as opposed to merely Democratic ) majority in both houses of Congress (and in the Senate, you need a supermajority of an institution that...

FEMINISM AND EX...

FEMINISM AND EX ANTE HOUSEWORK STANDARDS. Matt interprets data adduced by Jessica and finds more evidence for my assertion that the typical arrangement of housework in households occupied by heterosexual couples reflects unjust gender balances combined with actually different ex ante standards of cleanliness/tidiness (which are related to said inequalities, of course, but a feminist analysis doesn't require any specific ex ante level of domestic work beyond what is necessary for sanitation, cooking, childrearing, etc.) With all due respect to the great Marcotte and Waring I continue to disagree with the implied solution of creating equality within domestic work norms that are an unholy marriage of 1) patriarchy, 2) the related assumption of one partner devoted full-time to domestic work, and 3) general cultural assumptions that unstructured leisure time is somehow immoral. Instead I think that it makes more sense to try to achieve equality within a more rational allocation of...

THE GROWNUPS IN CHARGE

THE GROWNUPS IN CHARGE . Hilzoy explains the implications of today's revelations about the abject fiasco that is Bush 's North Korea policy: Let's be very clear about what this means. We used to have a deal, the Agreed Framework, that kept North Korea from getting plutonium. We supposedly discovered that they were cheating on that deal by enriching uranium. Personally, I did not think that was a good reason to scrap the Agreed Framework -- making a uranium bomb takes a lot longer than making a plutonium bomb, and I didn't see why the discovery that North Korea had embarked on a slow, cumbersome process of developing nuclear weapons, one that wouldn't actually produce any weapons for years, was a reason to say: well, go ahead and develop nuclear weapons much more quickly, then! All this time, though, I was assuming that the North Koreans actually had a uranium enrichment program, and that they actually were cheating on the Agreed Framework. That's what this article calls into question...

GORE'S OBSTACLE.

GORE'S OBSTACLE. Media Matters has a good response to Richard Cohen, who blames nameless "colleagues" for the interminable media smear campaign against Al Gore in 1999 and 2000, while conveniently forgetting his own frequent participation in said campaign. This does remind us of a point indirectly raised by Ed Kilgore . Not only is Gore exceptionally well-qualified for the office, he's somebody who can generate support in the Democratic Party from the netroots to Marty Peretz -- one would think that this would be a compelling reason for him to run. But even among people (like me) who would unquestionably be Gore supporters if he joined the race, there has to be serious concern about whether we'd be in for 18 months of Love Canal and Earth Tones and I Invented The Internet and God knows what other crap people would invent out of whole cloth. It is possible that the countless foreign and domestic policy disasters of the Bush administration may convince some people in the media that...

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