Culture

The Known Known of "The Unknown Known"? Rumsfeld Has No Regrets

Errol Morris's documentary of the ever-chuckling, never remorseful former Defense secretary is a spellbinder.

Middle-Aged White Males: No Longer the Ones Who Knock

As we bid Breaking Bad adieu, a few words about the antiheroes who reigned over the past decade—and are finally going gently into the good night.

A Twerk Too Far

Somewhere in America Miley Cyrus is appropriating black culture, but she's certainly not the only artist—we've got a long and tangled history of it. 

Rummy Returns

And it's like he never left.

Nikki Giovanni Remembers 1963 with a New Poem

New work from a legendary writer in honor of the March on Washington's 50th anniversary, and a conversation on growing up during the civil-rights movement

"Blue Jasmine" Another Black Mark

Woody Allen's new movie is the latest evidence of how superficial he is—and how his humor and New York sensibility have lured critics and filmgoers into overlooking his shallowness.

Morally Compromised Art, on the Big Screen

How do we judge a movie made from a book written by someone with repellent political views?

More Than a Teenage Dream

The Spectacular Now recalls an era of films that dealt with a complicated adolescent existence.

Near-Death Experiences Getting Slightly Less Mysterious

But there's still publishing gold in them thar clouds.

Artificial Love

Would it be possible to fall in love with an artificial intelligence? A new film seems to say yes.

Zombies, Zombies Everywhere

How the video game The Last of Us fits into the growing catalog of post-apocalyptic media.

Alec Guinness Gets a Makeover

The classic 1980s John le Carré miniseries Smiley's People is getting the Blu-ray treatment.

Not That Exciting

Pedro Almodovar's latest film, I'm So Excited! is less than thrilling but doesn't spell the end of the famed Spanish director. 

Shonda Rhimes' Huma Abedin

Real-life Huma Abedin is pretty much Scandal's fictional D.C. political fixer Olivia Pope. Both women know their way around a crisis. 

Last Day of a Young Black Man

Fruitvale Station's intimate portrait of Oscar Grant promises better days ahead for black film.

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