Archive

  • HOW ABOUT SOME SOS LOVE?

    HOW ABOUT SOME SOS LOVE? Massive disenfranchisement in the closest swing states have marred the last two presidential elections, and with that in mind, now would be a good time for progressives to focus on putting control of election oversight in the hands of competent and honest officials. While Secretaries of State Ken Blackwell and Katherine Harris have made nakedly partisan rulings to the benefit of their political patrons, progressives should focus on protecting every citizens' right to vote. Efforts like the Secretary of State Project (SOS), which attempts to raise money for incorruptible secretary of state candidates, are one way to go about this. Secretary of State elections are just as important as the House and Senate races that garner all the attention and money. Just as state legislatures have national importance because they control congressional redistricting, putting honest public servants in charge of election oversight at the state level has major implications -- for...
  • SCHMUCKS So...

    SCHMUCKS So can we just agree that the New York Post has decided terror is a laugh riot and should no longer be taken seriously when they run screaming headlines on the issue? -- Ezra Klein
  • MIKE'S PLANS.

    MIKE'S PLANS. Everyone is missing the point. I mean, seriously, look at this schedule . More cupcakes than Hostess makes in a month. The SEC is full of good teams that are all going to have one loss by Thanksgiving. The PAC-10 and Big 12 are landfills. Mountaineer Mike 's firing up the black-and-gold RV and we're not going to see him until WVU beats Ohio State for the BCS national championship next January. We will miss him, though. A lot. --Charles P. Pierce
  • GOODBYE, HELLO. To...

    GOODBYE, HELLO. To say a bit more than the shadowy " Editors " did, we learned today that Mike is stepping down. The Big Bossman, Supreme Leader, Creator of Light and Bringer of Fire wants to get back to writing. So, for all of us at The Prospect , there is little joy in Mudville today. On a personal note, Mike is the first real boss I've ever had. And, if from this I�ve gained the impression that bosses tend to have their feet on their desk and a tail of floss hanging from their teeth, he�s to blame. He's been an extraordinary editor, mentor, and friend. He's looked past the fact that I'm (give or take a few years) eleven years old, and not only believed in my writing and my ideas, but extended me the freedom to pursue, develop, and publish them. This has been, and remains, a dream job for me, and Mike not only gave me the golden key, but ensured that it worked in all the locks. During my year or so here, the magazine has become more visible, more influential, and simply better. I'm...
  • BOSSMAN, WE SALUTE YOU.

    BOSSMAN, WE SALUTE YOU. Speaking for myself, I just wanted to say it's been a great couple of years working for Mike and, while he'll certainly continue to be a part of the enterprise, I'll miss having him around the office every day; he's been a supportive editor and friend. But Harold 's great, too, so it's all okay. Meanwhile, to put on my web editor hat for a moment, I'll just say the website's going strong (I hope readers agree) and the only changes you might expect looking forward are further expansions and new folks coming on board. At any rate, regularly scheduled Tappeding shall resume soon! --Sam Rosenfeld
  • Does the I.M.F. Really Warn Argentina? With a Straight Face?

    The Washington Post reports this morning that the I.M.F. is telling Argentina�s president, Nestor Kirchner, that he must change his ways, if Argentina is to maintain its 9 percent GDP growth. Regardless of the specifics, the idea of the IMF giving advice to Argentina at this point is almost the dictionary definition of Chutzpah. Let�s take a quick trip down memory lane.
  • TOMASKY STEPPING DOWN.

    TOMASKY STEPPING DOWN. After three years, Michael Tomasky is stepping down as editor of The Prospect . He will pursue writing projects and will stay with the magazine as editor-at-large. Harold Meyerson will become acting executive editor. The press release is here . --The Editors
  • IT WAS WAL-MART,...

    IT WAS WAL-MART, IN ARKANSAS, WITH THE CORPORATE MEMO. That's that, then. Wal-Mart, the largest employer in America, has decided to cease offering traditional health care plans and move entirely to high-deductible, HSA-style offerings. Wake-Up Wal-Mart got their hands on some internal benefit memos, and here's what they showed: Among the most striking findings outlined in Wal-Mart�s 2007 benefits booklet is the substantial health care cost a low-paid Wal-Mart worker would be forced to pay under the so-called �Value� plan. A typical individual Wal-Mart worker who enrolls in the Value Plan will face high upfront costs because of a series of high deductibles, including a minimum $1,000 deductible for individual coverage, a $1,000 in-patient deductible per visit, a $500 out-patient surgical deductible per visit, a $300 pharmacy deductible, and a maximum out of pocket expense of $5,000 for an individual per year. In total, when factoring the maximum out-of-pocket expense and the cost of...
  • JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: WHO RIDES THE ELEPHANT?

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: WHO RIDES THE ELEPHANT? Tom reviews Ryan Sager 's new book, The Elephant in the Room , a libertarian lament of the modern GOP. --The Editors
  • DOG-WHISTLE POLITICS.

    DOG-WHISTLE POLITICS. One almost -- almost -- feels sorry for social conservative leaders who, like true Pavlovian devotees, believe that they can keep ringing the bell and the dogs will come running even though the politicians have stopped delivering the treats. As Noam Levey in The Los Angeles Times reports , House Republicans are desperately trying to pass another restrictive abortion bill to dupe their base into believing that somehow the most wasteful-spending Congress in American history is still run by conservatives: Scrambling to pass anti-abortion legislation before they recess for fall congressional elections, House Republicans on Tuesday won passage of a bill that would make it a federal crime to evade one state's parental consent laws by taking a minor to another state for an abortion. But in a mark of the majority party's struggles with its "values" agenda, Senate Republicans may run out of time to vote on the measure before lawmakers leave town at the end of the week...

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