Archive

  • ONE FOR THE FAMILY.

    ONE FOR THE FAMILY. So, this week, we read this about our commander in chief: He loves to cuss, gets a jolly when a mountain biker wipes out trying to keep up with him, and now we're learning that the first frat boy loves flatulence jokes. A top insider let that slip when explaining why President Bush is paranoid around women, always worried about his behavior. But he's still a funny, earthy guy who, for example, can't get enough of fart jokes. He's also known to cut a few for laughs, especially when greeting new young aides, but forget about getting people to gas about that. And we recall that, in accepting his party's nomination back in 2000, he read from his teleprompter the following sentiment: I know the presidency is an office that turns pride into prayer. Here�s the whole speech . In our new TAPPED home game, match the rhetorical bells and whistles therein with the subsequent Bush administration debacle of your choosing. Begin with Hurricane Katrina. Hours of family fun! --...
  • HENTOFF OFF-MESSAGE.

    HENTOFF OFF-MESSAGE. Nobody in this business has fought harder for the Bill of Rights than Nat Hentoff has, but this piece is just awful. Hentoff ought to be embarrassed to be tossing around accusations of anti-Semitism in the pages of a toy newspaper owned by Sun Myung Moon . The Great Father, after all, is on record as blaming the Holocaust on the fact that the Jews rejected Jesus . (Talk about your Golden Oldies of anti-Semitic theorizing.) He's even more widely on the record as condemning the separation of church and state, a doctrine on behalf of which Hentoff nobly has spilled more than his share of ink. If Hentoff's going to toss this silly charge around -- attributing generally to Connecticut's Democratic voters the idiocies of a couple of blog-commenters -- then he really ought not to be doing so while taking a check from a corrupt theocratic crackpot. --Charles P. Pierce
  • IN AIDS NEWS....

    IN AIDS NEWS. Hillary Clinton is blocking renewal of the 1990 Ryan White Act, the primary HIV/AIDS legislation covering people with low incomes and little or no insurance. The reasoning is kind of interesting: The old formula apportioned money based on the number of actual AIDS cases, heavily favoring areas like New York and San Francisco that absorbed the epidemic early on. The new formula would hand out cash based on HIV incidence rates, which would give quite a bit more to rural and Southern areas which were hit by the plague hit later and are still undergoing the transformation. This, of course, would take money from New York, which is why Clinton is blocking the bill. Unfortunately, I don't really know how much money is being shifted, and how that relates to the needs of various areas. My quick read is that this is a mixture of parochialism and insufficient resources -- that the new rules are supportable, but that what's needed is more funding in total, not the reallocation of...
  • JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: MIND MATTERS.

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: MIND MATTERS. Neil Sinhababu (everyone's favorite ethical werewolf) makes the philosophical case against Ramesh Ponnuru 's views on moral status and personhood in The Party of Death . Read to find out why Ponnuru's philosophy would mean "shrug[ging] at the enslavement of hobbits, the slaughter of kittens, and the destruction of all life beyond earth." --The Editors
  • PERPETUAL WAR.

    PERPETUAL WAR. Another bizarre Bush press conference led off the week followed by another great column by Fred Kaplan . Something I note in the text of the article that Kaplan doesn't make a big deal about, though, is Bush's statement that "We're not leaving, so long as I'm the president." Bush has said this or the equivalent several times, but it doesn't seem to have sunken in with people. On NPR this morning, I heard some talk about troop levels and discussion of when those levels might be reduced. But the answer, as you can see plainly if you pay attention, is not until someone else is in the White House at the earliest. Nevertheless, a week and a half ago, I found myself debating this point with a basically sympathetic radio host as if there was some serious doubt as to what Bush was planning. But he says it himself every once in a while -- his plan is to keep the troops there throughout the duration of his presidency, and any like-minded successor will just keep on keeping them...
  • The Wall Street Journal Discovers the Housing Bust

    Good to see that reporters and my fellow economists are now discovering some of the downsides of the housing bubble. The WSJ now recognizes the problem in part , although we're still only talking about something "harder than a soft landing but softer than a hard landing." But, that's progress. The article earns a BTP goat prize for failing to note that current house price indices are failing to pick up the full decline in prices because they miss the various concessions (seller paid closing costs, buyer-side realtor bonuses, and seller subsidized mortgages) that sellers often use to move their houses. The WSJ also notes that the housing affordability index hit a record low. How could that have happened, seems it was at record highs just a few years ago. Excuse me while I go tear my hair out . --Dean Baker
  • NPR�s Counterfeit Reporting on China

    NPR ran a piece this morning on �counterfeiting� in China. (Anyone who heard the story knows that NPR disapproves of the practice being discussed, but the term that neutral reporters use is �unauthorized copying.�) The segment included no economic analysis of the practice, which would point out many of the benefits of unauthorized copies. The segment included no discussion of the relative quality of the authorized copies. Nor did the segment even clarify the extent to which the unauthorized copies are genuinely counterfeit products. (The goods are only genuine counterfeits if the consumers believe that they are buying the brand whose products are being copies.) A serious report on unauthorized copying would discuss such issues, pointing out that unauthorized copying can provide enormous economic gains. If the brand product sells at 5 or 10 times the price of the copy, then the economic harm of eliminating the unauthorized copies is the same as imposing tariffs of 500 or 1000 percent,...
  • From the New York Times Canadian Health Care Bashing Desk

    As I have noted before (see � Missing Fact on British Health Care ,� May 7, 2006), the New York Times feels the need to periodically run articles on the health care crises in countries with universal health care systems. These articles never make comparisons to the health care situation in the United States, which might help readers put the articles in some context. An article in today�s Times fits the bill perfectly, reporting the surprising news that many Canadian doctors are hoping to make more money outside of the country�s public health care system. (Actually, the article never mentions the possibility that doctors want to leave the public system to make more money. The article implies that the doctors are just very publicly minded individuals who only think of the public good, not about money.) Anyhow, the article includes the obligatory assertions about long waiting lines in the Canadian system from a right-wing think tank. The article does not include any comments from...
  • JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: TANF TURNS TEN.

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: TANF TURNS TEN. On this, the 10th anniversary of welfare reform, we've posted two articles assessing a decade of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. From our March print issue, Chrisopher Jencks , Scott Winship , and Joseph Swingle analyze what went right (or at least, better than feared) and what may still go wrong. And in a new piece, analysts Margy Waller and Shawn Fremstad argue for a basic revision of how we think of TANF; it's many things, but it's not welfare. --The Editors
  • BOOKS OF SAND....

    BOOKS OF SAND. Chalk me up as one of those skeptics who don't buy, not even for a second, the spin that George W. Bush has read more than sixty books this year (via Steve Benen ). C-SPAN claims to have a partial catalog of his reading list, but none of it makes any sense. While I'm pleased Bush is trying to accrue some intellectual credibility, the boast reminds me of nothing so much as Steve Carell in The 40-Year-Old Virgin recounting how "her" breasts felt like big bags full of sand! Right guys!? In the flick, Carell's boast exposed his inexperience -- only a virgin would think that's how a breast felt. Bush's "sixty books" strikes me as similarly revealing. This is the claim of someone who wants to project dominance in a field he doesn't understand, and so wildly overreaches. Reading books, particularly nonfiction books, takes a really long time . It's hard, and it's boring, and I say this all as an effete liberal intellectual who likes reading long, boring books but can't, like...

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