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  • WHO KILLED COMPASSIONATE...

    WHO KILLED COMPASSIONATE CONSERVATISM? Over at the Drum Major Institute, Elana Levin flags down a great Washington Post story chronicling the Bush administration's vow of silence and oath of inaction on poverty in America. At least they're getting zen about it. As the article explains, that glorious post-Katrina speech when Bush mounted the podium to have his Lyndon Johnson moment was just that -- a moment, never to be repeated, remembered, or referenced by the administration again. But the roots of the Bush administration's betrayal on poverty reach far beyond Katrina. Compassionate conservatism, after all, was once more than an empty catch phrase; it described a policy philosophy that sought economic uplift through government incentives. Myron Magnet , author of the foundational compassionate conservative work The Dream and the Nightmare , met with Bush repeatedly during the campaign, and visitors to Karl Rove 's office used to leave with a copy of the book in hand -- according to...
  • JUST POSTED ONLINE:...

    JUST POSTED ONLINE: ANATOMY OF A MURDER. TAP talks to director Chris Paine about his new documentary, Who Killed the Electric Car? (It was Big Auto and Big Oil in the kitchen with the candlestick.) --The Editors
  • NEGROPONTE BLOCKS IRAQ...

    NEGROPONTE BLOCKS IRAQ EVALUATION. Considering that the United States is fighting a major war in Iraq, it's a bit curious that it hasn't been the subject of a National Intelligence Estimate since 2004. Ken Silverstein reports "that some senior figures at the CIA, along with a number of Iraq analysts, have been pushing to produce a new NIE." What's the problem? "They've been stonewalled, however, by John Negroponte, the administration's Director of National Intelligence, who knows that any honest take on the situation would produce an NIE even more pessimistic than the 2004 version." Of course, the intelligence community's full of al-Qaeda moles , as Rep. Peter Hoekstra 's been telling us without evidence, so there would hardly be any point in doing an NIE anyway. --Matthew Yglesias
  • SHOW ME THE...

    SHOW ME THE MONEY. Although there are many ways to compare �Hill committee� fundraising (year against, two-years-ago against, and, in the DNC/RNC case, four-years-ago against), and despite my advocacy for Howard Dean �s long-term investing in a 50-state strategy, you have to hand it to DSCC chair Chuck Schumer and DCCC chair Rahm Emanuel : These boys can ring the register . Cash-on-hand isn't everything, but it's a big thing at this point in the cycle. And sure, the RNC/DNC operate with a greater (but not exclusive) focus on the four-year cycle. But the latest numbers are what they are. To wit: * The DCCC leads the RNCC by a narrow, but still favorable 1.2 to 1 ratio in cash on hand ($32 million to $26.5 million). * The DSCC leads the RSNC by a mindboggling 1.9 to 1 ratio in CoH ($37.7 million to $19.9 million). * But the RNC leads the DNC by a whopping 4.1 to 1 ratio in CoH ($44.7 million to $10.8 million). Recall that in 1994, when it looked like a GOP wave was coming, interest...
  • YOU COULD HAVE...

    YOU COULD HAVE IT SO MUCH BETTER. My colleague Harold Meyerson has analogized the current Mideast crisis to the crisis set off by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in late June 1914: "Nobody wanted global conflagration, yet nobody knew how to stop it, and the American president (Woodrow Wilson, who was not yet a Wilsonian) did nothing to help avert the coming war." Rich Lowry retorts "that this significantly underestimates Germany's drive to war." He quotes from Michael Lind 's The American Way of Strategy : For half a century after 1914, most historians agreed that the great powers of Europe tragically had stumbled into an avoidable war. However, research in Imperial German archives in the 1960s revealed the truth: the Kaiserreich had deliberately launched a preventative war against Russia and its ally France, out of fear that growing Russian military power would soon make German dreams of European domination impossible to realize. I think that's right. And I also think...
  • COUNTDOWN TO CONSTITUTIONAL...

    COUNTDOWN TO CONSTITUTIONAL MELTDOWN. It's hard to avoid the temptation to begin counting the days in which H. Marshall Jarrett , director of the Justice Department's Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) , manages to remain in that post, especially since his objections to administration intervention in an inquiry he was conducting were made public earlier this week. OPR is the internal affairs office of the Department of Justice (DoJ). Testifying on Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales acknowledged that President Bush himself, in what the Washington Post 's Dan Eggen called "an unprecedented White House intervention" into an OPR investigation, thwarted an inquiry into the role "Justice Department officials played in authorizing and monitoring the controversial [National Security Agency (NSA)] eavesdropping effort, according to officials and government documents." The White House did so by denying security clearances to the OPR...
  • JUST POSTED ON...

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: I LOVE THE '90s. Greg Anrig liked Robert Wright 's concept of "progressive realism" as a foreign policy doctrine, and thinks it would be a useful rubric to apply to domestic policy as well. He makes the case for reviving a Clintonian appeal based on effective government after six years of conservative failure. --The Editors
  • REPUBLICANS AND CIVILIAN...

    REPUBLICANS AND CIVILIAN DEATHS. Here's the roll call for today's House resolution on the Mideast crisis. What Israel lobby? Snark aside, despite the monolithic quality of the final vote there actually does appear to have been a bit of behind-the-scenes wrangling over some of the language in this resolution. At her weekly press conference today Nancy Pelosi was asked why she removed her name as co-sponsor of the resolution: Pelosi: Well, last week when we met at this very time, before I came into this room, I had sent back my message to the Majority Leader that I fully supported the resolution that was sent over to us and that I would be willing to be a co-sponsor with him of it. The conversations I had with the International Relations Committee, with Mr. Lantos and his conversations with Mr. Hyde, were such that we thought this was all systems go; and I thought maybe we would take it up last Thursday. Then all of a sudden, the Republican leadership started to slow dance this, saying...
  • JUST POSTED ONLINE:...

    JUST POSTED ONLINE: POWER PLOY. To continue with the theme of the day , Marc Lynch of Abu Aardvark fame explains why pro-American Arab regimes are criticizing Hezbollah and Iran in such an explict and public fashion during this crisis. (Hint: shockingly, it's not because they're expressing the sentiments of their citizens.) The much-hyped communal dimension (Sunni-Shia) is probably a red herring, though. Arab arguments about Lebanon today fall along regime-popular conflicts rather than Sunni-Shia. Despite the sharp Sunni-Shia clashes in Iraq, and the anti-Iranian rhetoric coming out of Arab capitals, the appeal to the wider Arab public of the Shia Hezbollah movement seems to have only increased. Egypt�s very Sunni Muslim Brotherhood has strongly backed Hezbollah, while al-Jazeera (often described by disaffected Iraqi Shia as a �Sunni network�) has given largely sympathetic coverage. ...[T]these three regimes evidently see this crisis as an opportunity to demonstrate their value to the...
  • WHAT'S WRONG WITH...

    WHAT'S WRONG WITH SAMUELSON. To add to Tom 's more ideological critique of Robert Samuelson 's latest column, let me just point out that this is an excellent example of what irritates me about Samuelson: He's a policy writer who doesn't appear to know very much about policy. The whole column is about our lower-than-expected deficits and how stinky Republicans are for celebrating it. At no time does Samuelson see fit to mention why we have lower-than-expected deficits. Indeed, in no place does he signal that he even knows. And that's the problem. As anyone who cracked open Monday's Wall Street Journal knew, and as I explained here , the deficits were not -- despite Republican boasts, which Samuelson quotes -- healed by growth stemming from the tax cuts. Growth was precisely in line with expectations, but it was so localized to the rich that an unexpectedly large portion of the actual money generated went to the wealthy, and since they have higher tax brackets than the middle class, the...

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