Archive

  • INCIDENTALLY. . ....

    INCIDENTALLY. . . . No day is complete without at least one Corner-centric post, so cast your eyes hither where Michael Ledeen is musing on the merits of killing people rather than taking them prisoner and then after three grafs of that tosses off this aside, "But one thing I do know: I would insist that my soldiers have the right of 'hot pursuit' into Iran and Syria, and I would order my armed forces to attack the terrorist training camps in those countries. And I'm quite sure I'd go after the terrorist training camps in Pakistan, too." He'd launch wars with three new countries? What's going to happen after lunch? Does the rest of the National Review gang endorse this plan? --Matthew Yglesias
  • JUST POSTED ON...

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: A CANTERBURY TALE. The Anglican Archbishop has proposed a schism in his own Church following the ascension of a female, pro-gay bishop to the top leadership post in the U.S. Episcopal Church. Adele Stan describes the brewing fight and reaches some stark conclusions about the fate of the religious left in America: The dream of a progressive religious movement that could match the political potency of the Christian right was "always dubious," argues Stan, "and the recent turmoil within the Episcopal Church should put it to rest for good." --The Editors
  • PLANNED 'IMPROVEMENTS' AT...

    PLANNED 'IMPROVEMENTS' AT RFK. From today's Washington Post sports section: "We're doing what has to be done," Kasten said. He said that also includes planting flowers and improving the landscaping outside the stadium, steam-cleaning the concourses, adding banners outside the ballpark and staging races between innings around the perimeter of the field by costume characters resembling former U.S. presidents. Zachary Taylor vs. Chester Alan Arthur : That oughta be a good one. --Harvey Meyerson ( Harold 's cousin, Washington resident, devout baselball fan)
  • UNITER, OR ANOTHER...

    UNITER, OR ANOTHER DIVIDER? There�s a good column from E.J. Dionne today handicapping the coming wars in the Republican Party. Dionne surveys the GOP's 2008 landscape and notices that there are a series of real choices staking out territory, each of which would portend something radically different for the Republican Party's future. I agree with him particularly in his assessment of Mitt Romney , who Dionne writes is "his party's most interesting new voice, [and] could be expected to run in part as a problem-solver who worked with Democrats in Massachusetts for a bipartisan approach to health care. This would mean arguing for a break from the bitter partisanship of the Bush Era." That is how Romney will run. And, in doing, he'll shift the terms of the health care debate left, forcing his opponents to counter with similarly productive and substantial proposals. But remember, George W. Bush ran as a uniter, not a divider, too, and we saw how that turned out. So it's worth not being too...
  • JUST POSTED ON...

    JUST POSTED ON TAP ONLINE: JUST ADD MISSILE DEFENSE. Matt ruminates on the loony and seemingly indestructable id�e fixe of right-wing security policy: a non-functioning shield against non-existent missiles. What's significant -- and scary -- is that conservatives really seem to believe in this thing: Ballistic missile defense is, in short, not just a waste of money, but the tip of a wildly misguided intellectual iceberg -- a whole worldview that radically misconceives the nature of America�s interests and the contemporary international situation. The conservative movement is committed to an outlook that revolves around impractical solutions to unreal problems, and missile defense is just one more example to add to a pile including the invasion of Iraq, the decision to spurn Iranian peace overtures, and the effort to define the (necessary) struggle against al-Qaeda in the broadest and most apocalyptic terms available. Read the whole thing . --The Editors
  • GOOD NEWS. The...

    GOOD NEWS. The Bush administration plans to start following the Geneva Conventions . I expect conservatives everywhere who've written on this in the past to now denounce the President for his evil, appeasing ways. Today's laugh-or-cry moment: "Unlike four years ago . . . the debate now seems certain to include the views of the military�s most senior uniformed lawyers, whose objections were brushed aside earlier." Asking the military's lawyers about the legality of military policies -- what a crazy idea. I can't believe it only took them four years to come up with it. UPDATE: Hm . . . Spencer Ackerman isn't buying it -- the term "sick joke" comes up. Apparently, the CIA will still be free to abuse prisoners as it sees fit in sites all the world 'round. --Matthew Yglesias
  • INFORMATION! RUN! HIDE!...

    INFORMATION! RUN! HIDE! I was kind of skeptical of the whole concept underlying The Democratic Strategist when it first launched, but Scott Winship 's blog posts are rapidly becoming a vital -- and all-too-unbloggish -- source of actual empirical information. For example, during various recent blog wars it had occurred to me to hypothesize that both the Netroots and its enemies on the center-left were dramatically overstating the former's potential to influence things in the real world, as opposed to its salience in the media. But according to the data Winship posts here , I'm pretty much wrong. First, he "defined 'the Democratic netroots' as those adults who 'regularly' get 'news or information' from 'Online columns or blogs such as Talking Points Memo, the Daily Kos, or Instapundit' and who are either self-identified Democrats or liberals." This turns out to be about 2.24 million according to survey data from late 2004. A subset of those people -- 1.6 million of them -- "either...
  • DISCIPLINE & PUNISH....

    DISCIPLINE & PUNISH. As Matt notes , once the goals of political activists move from agenda-advancement to pure party protection and unity regardless of interests, the agendas at issue are likely to suffer. That's one reason I'm looking forward to reading movement conservative icon Richard Viguerie 's new book, Conservatives Betrayed: How George W. Bush and Other Big Government Republicans Hijacked the Conservative Cause , set for publication later this month. He's setting up his loyalty to conservatism against Karl Rove 's loyalty to Republicanism, and the clash of those two titans should be fun to watch in the months ahead. --Garance Franke-Ruta
  • Credit Card Debt Soars in May

    The initial reports on the Fed's release of consumer credit data for May focused on the slow 2.4 percent annual rate of growth reported for the month. This reporting misses the boat. There are two major components to consumer credit. The non-revolving component is primarily car loans. This component fell at a 2.0 percent annual rate, reflecting weak car sales. The other component is revolving credit. This is primarily credit card debt. This component rose at 9.9 percent annual rate in May. This is a sharp acceleration from earlier this year, when revolving debt was actually declining. It is always possible that a single month's data is simply an aberation and will be reversed next month. But if this proves to be the beginning of a trend, then the story goes like this: home prices have stopped rising and may even be declining in some places. This means that people can no longer sustain their consumption with by withdrawing equity from their homes. Therefore, many people are turning to...
  • SWM ISO BIG...

    SWM ISO BIG IDEAS. Andrei Cherny and Ken Baer 's latest op-ed on the power of ideas makes me want to bang my head against a wall -- which isn't a new idea, but an old one that should probably be implemented more often. Responding to the handful of pundits who are finally tired of the new ideas meme and have pointed out its vapidity, they write that the Democratic Party is "listening to the worried words of pundits and political professionals who counsel Democrats to avoid offering any vision or direction for the country � to instead simply wait for voters to so tire of Republican mismanagement that they will turn to more "competent" Democrats to administer a conservative state." Ah yes, because the nation's chattering class has been so quick to honor the Democratic Party's lack of grand concepts. Head, meet wall. Cherny and Baer go on to retell a version of American history wherein "the bravest conservative thinkers took on the GOP establishment and its most plodding, popular voices...

Pages