Archive

  • THE CORRECT PHRASE...

    THE CORRECT PHRASE IS SEXUAL SLAVERY. There�s lots of talk on the liberal blogs about Porter Goss 's sudden resignation as director of the CIA and whether it has anything to due with the burgeoning investigation into the prostitution/congressional corruption/homeland security contracting scandal centered around Brent Wilkes and deposed Congressman Duke Cunningham . ThinkProgress, as usual, has rounded up the relevant details and links. Earlier this week, Matt asked , "But though the hooker angle obviously sexes the story up for media consumption, what does it matter? Commercial sex hardly seems more wrongful than public corruption." Obviously, he was joking, but there's a lot more at stake in "the hooker angle" than just a sex scandal, if you think that prostitution is not a victimless crime. And a lot of evangelical conservatives, the heart and soul of Bush 's base, have come to believe that it is not. They believe that prostitution is, in the words of Concerned Women for America, "a...
  • HOOKERGATE'S FIRST VICTIM!...

    HOOKERGATE'S FIRST VICTIM! I have absolutely no evidence to support this, other than the fact that it involves the CIA, but since everyone else is speculating that Porter Goss 's resignation has something to do with the Wade/Wilkes/Cunningham/Foggo/limos/hookers nexus, why shouldn't I join the party, too? But instead of all this unwarranted speculation, how about tossing out a downright insane idea: Maybe George W. Bush is just clearing the decks for a major address next week in which he'll come clean about the WMD issue. Ah, Friday fun. --Matthew Yglesias
  • MEDIA WARRIORS. The...

    MEDIA WARRIORS. The New York Observer media blog The Transom issues a declaration of war against Salon. Much hilarity sure to ensue. This item explaining the declaration, though, is right on: WHEREAS, Ms. Walsh cannot perceive what Observer senior editor Tom Scocca has since dubbed The Inverse Dean Scream Effect�the inverse part being that the Dean Scream made total contextual sense to those in attendance at that long-ago post-caucus rally in Iowa but only appeared ludicrous in endless media transmissions, whereas Stephen Colbert's White House Correspondents Association Dinner routine was hilarious and sense-making in transcript yet not, according to attendees such as Mr. Lehmann, really at all funny in person, and; That about sums it up. Sometimes the facts really do look different on the ground. And now, thanks to Scocca, we have a name for that phenomenon. --Garance Franke-Ruta
  • DEMS ARE --...

    DEMS ARE -- GASP! -- STAYING ON OFFENSE. It was refreshing to read the toughly worded statement DSCC chief Chuck Schumer put out today about the AP poll which showed far more Americans want Democrats to run Congress. Said Schumer: The chickens are coming home to roost. An administration that is incompetent on both domestic and foreign affairs, doesn�t care about the average person and puts special interests ahead of everyday families desperately needs a counterbalance in Congress. The only way to achieve that kind of balance is to elect more Democrats and the American people see that more clearly everyday. The key here is this: To the extent Dems are the ones nationalizing the midterm elections on their terms -- exactly what Schumer is doing here by saying that only electing Democrats can check the awful damage the Bush presidency is inflicting -- they will be ones playing offense, and they will be the party with the initiative. If the GOP succeeds in nationalizing the election with...
  • MORE TNR...

    MORE TNR DARFUR, FEWER KUDOS. One of my favorite public intellectuals, Samantha Power , also pens an excellent essay which raises a crucial point that will likely make some of the Iraq war hawks who roam the halls of TNR rather uncomfortable. Thanks to the war in Iraq, sending a sizable U.S. force to Darfur is not an option. Units in Iraq are already on their third tours, and the crumbling Afghan peace demands ever-more resources. Moreover, sending Americans into another Islamic country is unadvisable, given the ease with which jihadis could pour across Sudan's porous and expansive borders. Making Darfur a magnet for foreign fighters or yet another front in the global proxy war between the United States and Al Qaeda would just compound the refugees' woes. I am glad that Power was able to sneak in these lines. Because, for an issue entirely dedicated to the Darfur genocide, there is surprisingly little in the way of specific remedial policy proposals, let alone ones that recognize the...
  • KUDOS TO...

    KUDOS TO KATZ. Marisa Katz �s contribution to The New Republic �s Darfur issue stands out as the issue's must-read piece. She writes an update of a trend in the Bush administration�s Sudan policy that I identified in the Prospect a year ago. Back then, the administration was hastily working to ensure that the Comprehensive Peace Accord (between the North and South) was implemented. So as not to upset these negotiations, the administration appeased Khartoum in a policy that bore the hallmarks of creeping rapprochement with the regime. Through kid-glove diplomacy and subtle winks and nods, such as upgrading Sudan�s sexual slavery status and granting a waiver to a K Street lobbyist to take Khartoum on as a client, the administration treated the regime in Khartoum as a partner in peace instead of like the criminals that they are. Katz unpacks this policy very thoroughly. To her account of diplomatic fumbles, however, I would also add Robert Zoellick �s first trip to Khartoum , where...
  • MIXED MESSAGES. It...

    MIXED MESSAGES. It would seem that the U.S. military's new mockery campaign against Abu Musab al-Zarqawi cuts two ways. (See the outtakes the military released, showing Zarqawi looking all bumbling and incompetent trying to fire a gun, here .) They unrolled the new footage at a Baghdad press conference, and to the extent this is actually targeted for Iraqi consumption, trying to cut Zarqawi's mystique down by revealing him to be (in the Times ' paraphrase) an "uninspiring poseur" makes some sense, I suppose. But for several years now, the administration's approach for domestic purposes has been to maximally exaggerate the power and centrality of "al-Qaeda's henchman in Iraq" to the difficulties besetting the American occupation. If Zarqawi's just a poseur, does that mean there's some broader and deeper difficulties associated with the occupation, difficulties that can't be addressed merely through killing this or that terrorist? --Sam Rosenfeld
  • TRUNCATE OFTEN? Charles...

    TRUNCATE OFTEN? Charles Krauthammer wants us to believe that if Iran builds a nuclear bomb, it will launch an unprovoked nuclear attack on Israel. As his evidence, he cites the fact that Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani once observed that "the use of a nuclear bomb in Israel will leave nothing on the ground, whereas it will only damage the world of Islam." This quotation has also made an appearance, so far, in two New Republic articles. One quick point to make is that given that the Iranian president doesn't control the country's security forces, and that Rafsanjani isn't president of Iran, it's a little odd to be citing his statements as authoritative policy pronouncement. Another point is that, as I laid out here , that's a very misleading truncation of what Rafsanjani said. If you read the statement in context, he was clearly saying that a nuclear bomb would give Iran the capacity to deter Israel , not the capacity to launch a first strike. The longer thing to say is that it's inane to...
  • BETTER COVERUPS NEEDED....

    BETTER COVERUPS NEEDED. Just a brief remark on the Patrick Kennedy situation: Since when did "I was wacked out on pills" become an acceptable cover story ? Why is that better than just being drunk? --Matthew Yglesias
  • THE NAME GAME....

    THE NAME GAME. Some commenters, in response to this post on George Allen 's turn as a Confederate officer in a 2003 movie, are alleging that Allen's child Forrest Allen was named after Nathan Bedford Forrest , a Confederate cavalry officer who was a founder of the Ku Klux Klan after the war and whose name remains a byword for racially-charged controversy . The same allegation has been leveled anonymously on other blogs, such as NotLarrySabato , RaisingKaine , and the Commonwealth Conservative , and repeated over at Virginia blog Bacon's Rebellion . A reader, upping the allegations, e-mails: It's even worse than that. The other two kids are named Brooke and Tyler . Robert Charles Tyler was the last Confederate general slain in battle. John M. Brooke was Confederate commander of ordinance, and a munitions specialist in Richmond. He defected from the Union Army to join the Confederacy. I have no knowledge of why Allen's kids are named as they are, but it should be noted, in his defense,...

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