Archive

  • By The Way

    Season 4 of Coupling isn't nearly as bad as you all led me to believe. It's not stunningly good, but it's certainly enjoyable.
  • Competing Truths

    Speaking of Miller, Armando's post on him, which led Atrios to award Miller "wanker of the day", seems wrongheaded to me. Armando flays Miller for being so faux-naive as to lament that Americans are no longer persuadable by facts without laying all blame on a spineless, whiny media. As evidence, he brings up Okrent, references Miller's tic of crucifying the Republicans and giving Democrats a token criticism for good measure, and so on. To me, this all seems pretty wrongheaded. When, exactly, was the media a truth-seeking missile? When were they honest and wholly aware of policy specifics? And did we agree with them then? Because I have a sneaking suspicion that the media we desire wouldn't be much closer to a media we like. When the left, myself included, imagines this platonic press corps, I think they've got something like themselves in mind, a nationwide operation that'll point out the right's lies and inconsistencies and apply the cynical interpretation that Bush so richly...
  • Persuading the Unpersuaded

    Matt Miller's meditation on persuasion is a good piece, and it's particularly relevant to us in the blogosphere. His basic point is that we don't live in a land of open-minded intellectuals conducting a constant search for new and better information with which to form arguments. Indeed, we live among a hardened populace where ideas, be they firmly based or intuitively arrived at, are most always protected in a transcendent mental realm that facts can't touch. That's why conservatives believe single payer health care can't work, why liberals have started decrying the infringement on states rights from NCLB, and why George W. Bush was considered better able to combat terror despite having failed to prevent an attack, failed to capture its financier, and weakened us by diverting energies towards Iraq. But the territory that Matt ignores is more important. It's not that all of America has couched their ideology in armor, it's just that the portion willing to swing, 20% or so of voters,...
  • Tiananmen Square

    Today is the 16th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre. I was barely conscious when the Chinese government decided to stop down on an incipient student protest, but the image that survived the confrontation has always stuck with me as the most powerful photo I've ever seen. So what better way to commemorate the day than to show the picture?
  • The FeMexican Conspiracy

    I've been reading some feminist theory lately, mainly Oaken's stuff about how to create a child-friendly nation, and it seems that the right's got a bad contradiction there. On the one hand, they're not willing to craft or pass the sort of legislation that'd make child-bearing easier for career-minded women, thus creating disincentives to large families and slowing down native population growth. On the other hand, large swaths of the American right are deeply unhappy about the ongoing "Mexicanization" of the country, and particularly with the growing ranks of immigrant families with high birth rates. Assuming they can't shutdown immigration -- and they can't -- wouldn't it make sense for them to support family-aimed legislation so American women would have more children and America's national "character" would be better preserved? Are they really so unhappy with women flooding the workplace, so dead-set against business regulation, or so wholly myopic that they can't support such...
  • Your Sudan Update

    Mark Goldberg's post on the evolving situation is Darfur is a must-read. So uh, go read .
  • Gulag Gulag Gulag

    EJ Dionne blasted Amnesty International in his column today for choosing the word "gulag" and letting the president obscure the issue with faux-indignation. Dionne misses the point. Amnesty's report didn't contain anything particularly new and stunning, at most it was a more comprehensive rundown of the situation than we've yet seen. Normally framed and delivered, it would've elicited a few articles, a quick flurry of blog posts, a McLellan obfuscation, and finally faded into obscurity. But the word gulag threw the Bush administration into such a tizzy that the news is still talking about the article, its contents, and whether or not America's actions have truly reached "gulag" levels. And that's why they used the word. Now TNR is writing snotty comparisons between Stalinist Russia and America, Republicans are loudly trying to discredit Amnesty, and lefty columnists are condemning the word choice but endorsing the content. On the bright side, they're all talking about Guantanamo. In...
  • The Charms of McCain

    I appreciate Greg's graphical proof that McCain is, as he constantly asserts, a conservative, but I think it's missing the point. Democrats don't like McCain on policy grounds. Indeed, except for fuel efficiency and campaign finance reform, a liberal would be hard-pressed to find anything approaching common cause with the successor to Barry Goldwater's seat. What they do like, and what moderates like, is McCain the person. They like the idea that someone could begin healing the partisan divide, that someone would enter office willing to listen to ideas from across the aisle, that someone would be willing to flout interest groups and ideological demands in order to work independently for what he believes to be the best interests of the country. That's why, when these bimonthly eruptions of posts proving McCain's a conservative occur, they seem so out of touch to me. Folks don't support McCain because of his ideology, they like him because of his demeanor, for what he represents in a...
  • A Message from the Liberal Media

    Oh liberal media, when will you learn? The President, contrary to widely-held beliefs, is not to be deified at all costs. So -- and yes I'm looking at you Janet -- if you really must write an article titled " He's Not Walking Like a Lame Duck ", this sort of lead doesn't quite capture the tone around here: When President Bush first latched onto mountain biking as his favored form of exercise, he plowed over rough terrain with a distinctive technique: Even when he pedaled uphill, he refused to shift to a lower gear. The message there, the unmistakable, grossly explicit, heavily delivered message, is that the president is a tough, no-nonsense, never-say-die kinda guy. It's a campaign commercial in a print paragraph. If you seek to continue receiving checks from the LA Times, you will have to stop writing like you are receiving checks from Karl Rove. You won't actually have to write like a progressive -- we like our liberal bias shockingly watered down around here -- but paeans to the...
  • Against Incrementalism

    A few days ago, Matt made a point I've seen elsewhere, and long meant to comment on. Call it the 50%+1 theory: Democratic performance in the past few elections has been good enough that one could envision a lot of difference paths to victory. Indeed, there's always a temptation to oversell defeats. After the Pistons last two losses to Miami, I've read a lot of articles about how Detroit needs to figure out how to contain Dwayne Wade. Certainly that would be a nice thing to do, but the reality is that they would have won with Wade uncontained if they'd just hit more free throws. There's nothing fundamentally wrong with their game -- they're just messing up some little things. That strikes me as exactly the wrong way to look at recent defeats. For one thing, our electoral coalition, which is already proving inadequate, is marching in the wrong demographic direction. The states that are growing vote Republican, in a few years, the same votes that brought us within a stone's throw of a...

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