Archive

  • Now They Tell Us

    Anybody remember this op-ed from Tommy Franks, attacking John Kerry during the election? The one where he said: take Mr. Kerry's contention that we "had an opportunity to capture or kill Osama bin Laden" and that "we had him surrounded." We don't know to this day whether Mr. bin Laden was at Tora Bora in December 2001. Some intelligence sources said he was; others indicated he was in Pakistan at the time; still others suggested he was in Kashmir. Tora Bora was teeming with Taliban and Qaeda operatives, many of whom were killed or captured, but Mr. bin Laden was never within our grasp. Yeah, me neither. But this admission from the Pentagon (via The Stakeholder ) brought it to mind: A commander for Osama bin Laden during Afghanistan's war with the Soviet Union who helped the al-Qaida leader escape American forces at Tora Bora is being held by U.S. authorities, a government document says. The document represents the first definitive statement from the Pentagon that bin Laden, the...
  • Revolutions for Everybody!

    What? Another revolution ? In Kyrgyzstan? It's like a flu going around (somewhere, Malcolm Gladwell heard that and raised a fist in solidarity). In any case, this one seems like it went pretty orderly, which is all you can hope for. I don't pretend to know anything about the situation in Kyrgyzstan so I've no way to evaluate this. Sue , who does, is pretty shocked, and adds that, atypically, it was spearheaded by rural villagers, which warms my proletarian heart. Anyway, huzzah! Power to the people! But have you ever seen an opposition leader less excited to be liberated from jail than this guy? That's a "who are you kids and why are you waking me up" look if I ever saw one. Caption him in comments if the spirit so moves you.
  • Arms to China?

    Timothy Garton Ash is quite right on this -- the EU should be ashamed that it needed White House pressure to maintain its arms embargo on China. Readers know I'm something of an EU booster, mainly because I think their emphasis on diplomatic relations, morally defensible policy-making, and emphasis on soft power are proving pretty powerful as a counterweight to American belligerence. But you can't spend the days pasting gold stars on yourself and then turn around to try and ship armaments to a country with a terrible human rights record and a continuing habit of threatening to invade Taiwan. And to be talked down by Bush? Someone should be apologizing for allowing that gut punch to European dignity. As Garton writes, it's not that the US is blameless here -- we export 6.7% of China's weapons while Europe only provides 2.7%, and it's hard to fault the EU for wanting to cultivate the Dragon as a primary trading partner (this year, the EU passed America as China's largest source of trade...
  • The CAP Health Care Plan

    Now for the promised health care post. I don't claim to know as much about health policy as Brad does, so his objections -- that stopgap measures will make bad policy and we really need to go to single-payer -- should be taken seriously. Not only that, but I agree with them. Nevertheless, politics is the art of the possible (and occasionally, the train-wreck of the impossible), and there's simply not a constituency for single-payer right now. I should back up here. The CAP plan , released yesterday, works like this: • Coverage for All • Expand the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) to anyone lacking job-based health insurance, any employer who wants to buy in, and any individual who wants to buy in. In addition, contributions to the plan would be capped at 5-7.5% of income so no one was felled by health care costs (good call, since the new bankruptcy law allows them to put you in the stocks if a health catastrophe takes out your finances). For those who paid over, a tax...
  • I Just Can't Outwonk Them

    Damn that Brad Plumer . Seriously -- I link and I link, and where does it get me? Fucking nowhere. I was all excited, everybody else had spent the day worrying about the Trustees Report, while my clever self had sidestepped them and read CAP's new health care plan . In full. And made notes in the margins. So while they all talked about solvency and proved smart today, I'd start out tomorrow with a preemptive strike, nailing the plan first and thus winning the wonk competition. But it was not to be. Plumer, who spent the day poring over the Trustees Report, decided to spend the night on the health care plan. Bastard. Anyway, he's got a lot of stuff on it and, though I do it grudgingly, I'd suggest you read it. But make no mistake -- I'll still be starting tomorrow with a nice big post on it. Though, at this rate, Matt'll beat me too and I'll just look like a poseur. So uh, FEHBP expansion, good call! Medicaid for more, I also like! Emphasis on preventive medicine, IT improvements,...
  • I'm Gross

    Sir Singer writes : I think I grew up fairly independent. I learned how to cook, clean, launder, etc., as a child, but most of my female friends who live on their own still have cleaner houses than me. They generally are more on their at-home shite than I am. Meanwhile, I’m a good cook, but a house that relied upon me for cleanliness would be a relatively sad site (just ask my roommates). I'll second that, with a caveat. I'm a really good cook. Don't believe me? Ask my girlfriend, she can field questions in the comments. I just am -- it's a very weird, highly unexpected talent. Things I make turn out way better than they have any right to. Further, I love cooking, so it works out well. But I hate cleaning. Worse, I don't think it important. Not so much cleaning up clutter, I know I need to do that, but mopping, dusting, vacuuming, cleaning mirrors, scrubbing sinks -- if I lived on my own, this stuff just wouldn't be done. Now, if someone tells me to do it and it's my share of the...
  • McCain’s Slide into Irrelevance Continues Unabated

    (I had a pretty wonky post on Social Security ready to go, but Ezra beat me to it, so instead you’re getting my latest rant on the increasingly useless John McCain. Enjoy!) Not to be all Seinfeldian about this or anything, but what is <b>with</b> this guy ?! Sen. John McCain said Tuesday the conclusions of a commission investigating intelligence failures on weapons of mass destruction should not lead to new questions about whether the Iraq war was justified. "America, the world and Iraq is better off for what we did in bringing democracy," McCain said. The Arizona Republican is a member of a commission formed by President Bush over a year ago after the chief weapons inspector in Iraq, David Kay, resigned saying "we were almost all wrong" about the pre-war estimates that Saddam Hussein possessed banned weapons. […] In a recent interview, McCain said the report by the panel led by Republican Laurence Silberman and Democrat Chuck Robb was worth the $10 million Congress...
  • Jokes You Shouldn't Laugh At But Do

    From Daniel Munz : With the 11th Circuit Court having rejected the Schiavos' appeal , it seems like the Supreme Court is their last recourse. It's sort of inconceivable to me that they would grant cert: Scalia, conservative as he is, must be vomiting at the federal overreach. (Also, does Rehnquist really want to hear a case about impending death?) Also funny, but in far better taste, is this analysis of which demographics read which newspapers.
  • Social Security Trustees Report

    That, of course, was the day's big news. Some minor fiddling allowed them to bring the insolvency date a year closer, from 2042 to 2041. An insignificant change economically, but highly significant politically, as it'll allow them to argue that things are getting worse and, in the worsd of Fafblog !, if we don't do anything Social Security will explode ! If I had time, I'd probably go through the report today and talk about things I don't quite understand. But I have to move down for Spring Break. So here's a cliff notes guide to what you need to know and links to what you need to read. As mentioned above, they moved the date of the trust fund's exhaustion (but I thought the fund didn't exist!) back a year, from 2042 to 2041. They also pushed back the beginning of the cash deficit (when we start using the trust fund) from 2018 to 2017. They seem to be doing this by revising death rates downward -- at this rate, there'll come a point when no one will ever die -- and by using absurdly...
  • Final Update

    So that went badly. Not only did I sleep through my alarm, losing desperately needed study time, but I also had the time of the final wrong, and so arrived an hour after it began. Not that that really mattered, as I didn't know enough to write for three hours anyway. Also, I'm sick. And if you've never sat for two hours leaking from your nose and wishing you had thought to bring a Kleenex, your only distraction your throbbing head and the answers you don't know, you really haven't lived. Anyway, the bright side is that this quarter is over and Spring Break beckons. Onward.

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