Lightning Round: Revolving Doors.

  • It looks as though an emerging conservative narrative coming out of Saturday's violence is that once again, a Democratic president will knowingly exploit the event to blame the conservative media for inciting violence. Or in the words of the ever classy Rush Limbaugh, "What Mr. Loughner knows is that he has the full support of a major political party in this country." Perhaps I just don't get Mr. Limbaugh's sparkling and sarcastic wit here, but as others are discovering, it seems pointless to even engage this topic anymore.
  • This brief item on former Sens. Byron Dorgan and Bob Bennett getting into the lobbying game mere days after leaving office is a good example of the nebulous nature of this "lobbying" business. We learn that Arent Fox, LLC, the lobbying firm, covers "a range of clients" and Mr. Dorgan's and Mr. Bennett's experience in "key policy areas including taxes, energy, financial services and trade" are quite valuable. Questions: Is it safe to assume that all former members of Congress are looking to cash in? Are any working in the public interest? I'm not blaming the blog post for a lack of depth of reporting, but doesn't the subject seem worthy of a look in long form?
  • The editors of National Review weigh in on "an undeserved, unjustified, and unconscionable act of political persecution": "But unless a Texas appeals court throws out this outrageous prosecution, and the unjustified conviction and sentence, [Ronnie] Earle will get away with his appalling abuse of power. And Tom DeLay will end up in prison not because he broke the law, but because he was so effective a politician that his opponents were willing to do anything to bring him down." That's ... an interesting choice of a martyr, but OK.
  • Remainders: Greg Sargent shares the news that George Will is uncharacteristically engaging in intellectual dishonesty; Mitt Romney's BFF will be covering his (likely) 2012 presidential campaign; and "anti-Islam blogger to hold pro-Wal-Mart rally" might sound like a strange headline, but that doesn't make it any less true.

-- Mori Dinauer

Comments

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