Not So Different From the Old Rich.

If you're looking for some midday feature reading, you can't do much better than Chrystia Freeland's piece on the "new global elite" in The Atlantic. The whole thing is very good, though I have a small quibble with this passage:

What is more relevant to our times, though, is that the rich of today are also different from the rich of yesterday. Our light-speed, globally connected economy has led to the rise of a new super-elite that consists, to a notable degree, of first- and second-generation wealth. Its members are hardworking, highly educated, jet-setting meritocrats who feel they are the deserving winners of a tough, worldwide economic competition -- and many of them, as a result, have an ambivalent attitude toward those of us who didn’t succeed so spectacularly.

If "ambivalent" is code for disdain -- passive or otherwise -- then these nouveau riche aren't so different from their predecessors; with few historical exceptions, the rich have always been ambivalent about the poor and less fortunate. Indeed, I wouldn't be shocked if the presence of "meritocracy" (as if these people have no prior advantages) intensified feelings of disdain. After all, if you can succeed, why can't these people (and as a corollary, "what right do they have to my wealth")?

To be fair, disdain for the less fortunate is completely understandable as a response to visible disparities. On some level, we all know that our position is an accident of birth. For a lot of people, a sense of class superiority is a necessary part of the illusion that they are "deserving" of their good fortune.

-- Jamelle Bouie

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