Adam Serwer

Adam Serwer is a writing fellow at The American Prospect and a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He also blogs at Jack and Jill Politics and has written for The Village Voice, The Washington Post, The Root, and the Daily News.

Recent Articles

If I Were President...

The New York Times has a feature asking "If I were president" which basically involves the enlisted getting wistful about all the things they'd do if you know, Congress didn't existed and if the office of the presidency conferred the ability to work magic. As for me well, if I were president, I would make sure all the money's spent on good things. I would not jock the fact that there are rich people in the world because, yo, I got a girl and she needs new clothes and I need new sneakers. And that's all I know.

What Happened To Rick Perry, "No Apologies Candidate?"

Texas Governor Rick Perry, whom Washington Post reporter Chris Cilizza dubbed the "no apologies" candidate, disavows entirely a book he wrote last year endorsing the view that New Deal reforms like Social Security are unconstitutional. Ian Millhiser writes , "After just a few days of embarrassing press, however, Perry now expects the country to believe that his entire book was not intended to be a factual statement." He suggested the program’s creation violated the Constitution. The program was put in place, “at the expense of respect for the Constitution and limited government,” he wrote, comparing the program to a “bad disease” that has continued to spread. Instead of “a retirement system that is no longer set up like an illegal Ponzi scheme,” he wrote, he would prefer a system that “will allow individuals to own and control their own retirement.” But since jumping into the 2012 GOP nomination race on Saturday, Mr. Perry has tempered his Social Security views. His communications...

Where There Won't Be Vindication

Over at Greg's I mock the right's reaction to good news in Libya: McCain and Graham, both of whom had warm personal interactions with Ghadafi in the past, have now gotten exactly what they wanted from the administration’s decision to intervene. But GOP partisanship demands that they not acknowledge the president’s role in assembling the global coalition that aided the rebels. Indeed, with the Republican Party wedded to a contradictory image of the president as foreign policy weakling and iron-fisted domestic dictator, we’re going to see a lot of bizarre rationalizing of what happened in an attempt to preserve this narrative of the Obama presidency. While the Libyan rebels have earned a moment of celebration, toppling Ghadafi was still the “easy” part, relatively speaking. The “hard” part is the post-conflict transition to a stable government that respects the individual rights of its citizens. The premature celebrations of victory in Iraq in 2003 should be a reminder of this. A...

Causality

The Obama administration is reportedly pressuring New York's new Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to go easy on the banks and engage in the "settlements in lieu of prosecutions" approach to financial crime that started with the Bush administration. In an interview on Friday, Mr. Donovan defended his discussions with the attorney general, saying they were motivated by a desire to speed up help for troubled homeowners. But he said he had not spoken to bank officials or their representatives about trying to persuade Mr. Schneiderman to get on board with the deal. “Eric and I agree on a tremendous amount here,” Mr. Donovan said. “The disagreement is around whether we should wait to settle and resolve the issues around the servicing practices for him — and potentially other A.G.’s and other federal agencies — to complete investigations on the securitization side. He might argue that he has more leverage that way, but our view is we have the immediate opportunity to help a huge number of...

Bloggingheads: Perry And Louie Edition

I talk Rick Perry, civil liberties, and the genius of Louie CK with Conor Friedersdorf: A coda on our discussion on Perry's decision to mandate the HPV vaccine, from Amanda Hess: Thanks to HPV, just about everyone has a sexually transmitted infection these days. About 20 million Americans are currently infected with one or more strains of the virus. Six million more are infected each year. If you have sex, you're more likely than not to get it before you die. Forty percent of women will contract it within just 16 months of their first vaginal intercourse. And the virus' proliferation has complicated Americans' moral judgments concerning sexual activity. The ubiquity of HPV has democratized sexual stigma—the virus infects people of all races, classes, and sexual orientations. If contracting a virus from sex is the norm, it makes it more difficult to dismiss people with STIs as moral degenerates or irresponsible sluts. At the same time, the proliferation of HPV among young people has...

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