Adele M. Stan

Adele M. Stan is a columnist for The American Prospect. She is research director of People for the American Way, and a winner of the Hillman Prize for Opinion & Analysis Journalism.

Recent Articles

SEPARATION ANXIETY.

SEPARATION ANXIETY. Like my colleague Sam Boyd , I was quite entertained by yesterday's Rove -a-thon on the Sunday talk shows. While brother Sam duly noted perhaps the most amusing iteration of Rovian grandiosity ("I'm Beowulf; I'm Grendel), I found myself most riveted by the former deputy chief of staff's interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. For Rove, not only does the Constitution live, so do its founders, who apparently speak to him from the beyond, granting new powers to his favorite branch of government. On Meet the Press , he explained to David Gregory just why he would not testify before Congress: KARL ROVE: We have a constitutional separation of powers. The founders talk about this. They, they understood this issue, and they wanted to insulate the judicial, the executive and the legislative from each other in this respect. Wait; it gets better: KARL ROVE: It should not— -- the Constitution should not be weakened, and we should not weaken the prerogatives of the power of...

IS ROVE OFF THE HOOK?

IS ROVE OFF THE HOOK? He may have used the personnel and apparatus of taxpayer-funded government agencies for partisan political purposes, but even if that's proven beyond a reasonable doubt, and in violation of the law, Karl Rove 's imminent exit from the West Wing may just let him off the hook. As I reported earlier this week, among the many fingers pointing at Rove is one belonging to Scott J. Bloch , director of the Office of Special Counsel, which administers the provisions of the Hatch Act, a 1939 law that regulates the role of government employees in electoral politics. Detailed here by CQ's Shawn Zeller, Bloch's investigation has come as close as any to really nailing Rove, having turned Rove's special e-mail account with the Republican National Committee (RNC), which he apparently used to communicate with government employees at their "dot-gov" e-mail addresses. But that, even when leveraged by investigations by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (led by...

What Really Brought Rove Down?

When the Bush administration angered one of its most hard-right officials, he launched an investigation into Karl Rove's politicization of the federal government.

President Bush puts his arm around Karl Rove during a news conference announcing Rove's resignation yesterday. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)
Tick off your garden variety wing-nut, and the cork is swiftly pulled from that vial of vitriol soon to be dumped on your cornflakes. But tick off a hard-line religious rightie, and you just might come to intimate terms with his terrible swift sword. Just ask former White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove, once the genius architect of invincible success -- before he became the architect of abysmal disaster. Ask him about a guy named Scott Bloch. Or another named David Kuo , the former Number 2 at the Bush administration's Office of Faith-Based Initiatives, who let the cat out of the bag last year when he detailed Rove's disdain for the religious Bush partisans whom Rove, according to Kuo, dubbed "the nuts." Bloch, one such "nut" and director of the Office of Special Counsel (OSC), may have been Rove's ultimate undoing. Sure, it could have been the long reach of the Jack Abramoff affair, or something completely new and yet to be revealed, that pushed Rove out the West Wing portico...

WHERE THE GIRLS ARE: NOT ENOUGH AT YEARLY KOS

WHERE THE GIRLS ARE: NOT ENOUGH AT YEARLY KOS Today the Washington Post 's Jose Antonio Vargas has an interesting piece about the white, male, middle-aged character of the Yearly Kos conference, which I blogged for Real Women, Real Voices , the blog of the National Women's Editorial Forum . What got to me in Vargas's piece was the hand-wringing about where the girls are -- or aren't, and why that is. "While the Huffington Post and Fire Dog Lake , both founded by women, are two of the most widely read blogs," Vargas writes, "the rock stars are mostly men, and many women bloggers complain of sexism and harassment in the blogosphere." He goes on to report on the panel, "Blogging While Female," which was moderated by Prospect Senior Editor Garance Franke-Ruta (and which I blogged right here ). Of the general lack of diversity, be it gender, racial, generational, or cultural, Vargas writes, "Everyone agrees it's a problem, yet no one is sure how to address it." He notes a phenomenon I had...

PELOSI: IF THINGS WERE DIFFERENT, I'D WANT TO IMPEACH.

PELOSI: IF THINGS WERE DIFFERENT, I'D WANT TO IMPEACH. At a meeting between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and some dozen-and-a-half journalists, the speaker reiterated her reluctance to embark on impeachment hearings. (The meeting was convened in honor of the late, great progressive activist Maria Leavey .) First, in answer to a question by Michael Tomasky about the planned introduction of an impeachment measure targeting Attorney General Alberto Gonzales , the speaker said, "I would prefer to stay focused on our agenda." She had outlined a long list of legislative priorities, the latest being the children's health insurance bill (S-CHIP), which is scheduled this week for a vote. Later I asked about the tension between the pressure to pass an ambitious legislative agenda and simultaneously protect the Constitution, which I personally fear will be a pile of ashes by the time Bush & Co. finally leave town. At first I got the answer I expected, all about the need to conduct the people's...

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