Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

Alexander Hertel-Fernandez is a doctoral candidate in government and social policy at Harvard University.

Recent Articles

Employer Political Coercion: A Growing Threat

Since Citizens United, companies can legally require workers to participate in politics—and fire them if they refuse.

Photographee.eu/Shutterstock
Photographee.eu/Shutterstock This article appears in the Fall 2015 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . A common piece of advice for new hires is to avoid talking about politics, sex, and religion in the workplace. But it may be increasingly difficult for workers to keep their politics to themselves. Thanks to the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United , employers now have broad legal rights to campaign for political candidates inside their firms as well as in the public arena. And thanks to new technology, they have the means to track their employees’ political opinions and activities. Managers and supervisors can now legally require their workers to participate in politics as a condition of employment. For instance, in most states, managers have the legal right to mandate worker attendance at a political rally for a favored candidate—and fire or punish workers who decline to participate. Consider the following examples from recent years of employers...