Amanda Marcotte

Amanda Marcotte is the executive editor of Pandagon.net and the author of the book, It's A Jungle Out There: The Feminist Survival Guide to Politically Inhospitable Environments. She lives in Austin, Texas.

Recent Articles

Faulty Hypothesis

Flickr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

A scientist argues that members of his field should support more Republicans, but ignores why his colleagues fled the party.

The VAWA Vacuum

States and local police departments can overcome Congress's failure to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.

U.S. House of Representatives members push for the unrestricted reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in May. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

States and local police departments can overcome Congress's failure to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.

Putting the NRA on Defense

AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Christian Gooden

Every mass shooting, there’s a brief flare-up of discussion about gun control, followed by an inevitable dropping of the subject as liberals give up hope that anything can be done about guns when conservatives control the discourse so thoroughly. It’s become so predictable that even lamenting the process has in itself become a cliché. The notion that owning semi-automatic assault rifles that can shoot off six rounds a second is a “right” has become so embedded that many people, including our president, have calculated that it’s fruitless to even try to start drafting legislation that would restrict the sale of such weapons.

Jim Moran: How Not to Respond to Domestic Violence

Wednesday afternoon, the news broke across D.C. media and disconcertingly excited right-wing blogs that Patrick Moran, the son of Representative Jim Moran, a Democrat from Virginia, had pled guilty to assaulting his girlfriend of six months. The police report stated that two officers saw Moran grab his girlfriend by the back of the head and smash her head into a metal trash can, breaking her nose and fracturing her skull.

Stop Blaming Single Mothers

Taking male pundits—liberal and conservative—to task for pushing marriage before motherhood.

Flickr / 50s Family

What magic power do single mothers possess that make them the target for so much blame for social ills? What witchery are they engaged in that can turn even liberal men—even those who pride themselves on supporting feminist causes!—into reactionaries breathlessly opining that the poor only have themselves to blame for their sexually incontinent ways? Whatever it is, the latest victim is Nicholas Kristof, once champion of ending sex slavery and improving maternity care, but most recently hitting The New York Times to accuse rural single mothers of turning down perfectly nice offers of marriage and forcing their kids to be illiterate in order to get disability checks from the government.

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