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Devil In The Details

Chalabi-palooza The conquering fabricator has returned. On November 9, Ahmad Chalabi, the notorious Iraqi exile who fed a hungry Pentagon and hungrier press corps fantastic tales of Saddam Hussein's bristling arsenal of weapons of mass destruction and joint ventures with Osama Bin Laden, was greeted as a hero at Washington's most influential pro-war think tank. Escorted by a phalanx of Secret Service officers and D.C. police, Chalabi, once president of the dissident Iraqi National Congress and now deputy prime minister of Iraq, strode triumphantly into his den of true believers. Chalabi-fest at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) was about to begin. Inside the plush conference center, a beaming Michael Rubin, AEI fellow and former aide to Iraq viceroy Paul Bremer, bounced around like a 6-year-old at Hanukkah. Fellows Danielle Pletka and Reuel Marc Gerecht stood on the side of the room exchanging smiles. And over by the cookie table, Laurie Mylroie, the terrorism expert and...

Valerie, Scooter, And More

The denouement of the Plame scandal has been a long time coming. Below, browse some of our archived coverage. The Forgetters by Michael Tomasky Kristof and Tierney have a point. But there's an obvious counterpoint that everyone seems to have forgotten. [10/25/2005] Pulling Punches And Judy by Greg Sargent New York Times executives take care of their employees. But what about their readers? [10/3/2005] Remember The Memo by Michael Tomasky As the noose tightens at the White House, the State Department memo may be the key piece of Plame evidence. [10/3/2005] Who Gives A Flying Flag? by Todd Gitlin The smearing of Joe Wilson, the excuses for Karl Rove: For the pundits of the right, national security is just a bumper sticker. [September 2005] The Meeting by Murray Waas Scooter Libby and Judy Miller met on July 8, 2003, two days after Joe Wilson published his column. And Patrick Fitzgerald is very interested. [8/6/2005] Rove On The Ropes by Joe Conason Sure, let's gloat: The president's...

Dossier: An Ounce Of Detention

The United States has detained approximately 70,000 people outside U.S. territory since late 2001 … It's believed that more than 10,000 are still in U.S. custody in various camps and prisons in the United States, Cuba, Iraq, and Afghanistan ... In a May 13, 2004, story, The New York Times reported that the whereabouts of the high-level al-Qaeda detainees were so secret that “one official said he had been told that Mr. Bush had informed the CIA that he did not want to know where they were” … U.S. agents in Abu Ghraib hid numerous detainees from the Red Cross, according to a leaked report by U.S. Army Major General Antonio Taguba ... These people were referred to as “ghost detainees” ... According to General Paul Kern, who oversaw one of the military investigations into U.S. policies and practices of interrogation and detention, there were “perhaps up to 100” cases of ghost detainees in U.S. custody in Iraq … American forces have operated at least 17 detention facilities in Iraq and 25...

Devil in the Details

At Least He's Loyal Joe Lieberman may not have the voting record of a Republican, but he's often irked liberals with his unfortunate habit of playing one on TV. His reputation for disloyalty is unlikely to be undone by his decision to attend an October 8 party celebrating the 50th anniversary of the conservative magazine National Review and honoring its founder, William F. Buckley Jr. Lieberman, according to Rush Limbaugh, was seated at the table of honor with Buckley and Limbaugh himself. In reality, it would have been churlish of Lieberman not to attend: After all, he practically owes Buckley his Senate seat. Running in 1988 against moderate incumbent Republican Lowell Weicker, Lieberman did not hesitate to launch attacks from the right. “You're closer to Fidel Castro than to Ronald Reagan,” Lieberman charged during one televised debate, citing Weicker's support for normalizing trade relations with Cuba. Buckley formed a PAC (“Buckleys for Lieberman”) that ran anti-Weicker ads,...

Who Should Go?

The New York Times -- and specifically, Publisher Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. and reporter Judith Miller -- have come under fire not only for Miller's role in the CIA investigation of the Valerie Plame leak but for her reporting on Iraq, WMDs, and the Oil-for-Food scandal. Here, some of the top journalism professors in the country take on the following questions: Who should be fired -- Sulzberger or Miller? Neither? Or both? Journalists should be investigated -- like everybody else Judith Miller and her chain of bosses up to and including the publisher were derelict. She has never explained her misleading WMD coverage. "WMD -- I got it totally wrong," she said to Don Van Natta, Jr., Adam Liptak, and Clifford J. Levy. "The analysts, the experts and the journalists who covered them -- we were all wrong. If your sources are wrong, you are wrong." But not everyone's sources were wrong, and not every journalist was wrong. She owes her readers, and her employers, an explanation for her very...

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