The American Staff

Recent Articles

Dossier: Bordering On Ludicrous

In August, Governors Bill Richardson of New Mexico and Janet Napolitano of Arizona declared states of emergency due to illegal immigration across their borders ... The declarations allow the governors to spend nearly $1.5 million each to bolster the states' law enforcement and border patrols ... In 2004, 537,151 people were naturalized to the United States ... 54 percent settled in four states: California, New York, Florida, and Texas ... The United States has a yearly net migration rate of 3.31 people per 1,000 ... 30 countries have net migration rates higher than the United States ... Immigration rates today are about the same as they were one century ago … There are approximately 7 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States ... In 2004, an average of 22,812 people were detained daily by the Immigration and Naturalization Service ... The U.S.–Mexican border is 1,952 miles long ... At any given time, it is protected by 2,000 border-patrol agents … More than 3,000...

Devil In The Details

Bolton Begins John Bolton is in the building. Just three weeks before some 170 heads of state converged on New York for the September 14–16 United Nations summit, which considered the most ambitious set of reforms in the organization's history, the new recess-appointed U.S. ambassador tossed a wrench in the works. Discarding months of diplomatic toil, Bolton submitted a modest 750 alterations to the 39-page text of proposed UN reforms, throwing the negotiations into complete disarray. Many of these edits were merely grammatical, and some were just petty jabs at the organization, such as eliminating the word “all” from the second paragraph (“We recognize the valuable role of all the major UN conferences …”). But some marked a significant change in the U.S. bargaining position heralded by Bolton's arrival at Turtle Bay. Perhaps none of these was more obnoxious (and more instructive of Bolton's new influence) than the systematic removal of all 14 references to the Millennium Development...

The Full Roberts

The fireworks everybody expected may not materialize, but this weeks hearings in the Senate Judiciary Committee are still crucial. Will John Roberts sail through unchallenged? What questions should Democrats ask? Below, some of the Prospect 's coverage of the nomination from this summer. Just Say No by Matthew Yglesias Democrats don't have to filibuster John Roberts -- but they don't have to vote for him, either. [7/26/2005] Meet John Roberts by Adele M. Stan A first-class lawyer with a sense of humor. Too bad he's a threat to women's rights -- and the Constitution. [7/20/2005] He's No Souter by Michael Dorf Many liberals are heartened by the possibility of Justice Roberts. They shouldn't be. [7/20/2005] High Court, High Stakes by Bruce Ackerman On morality, regulation, and privacy, the right seeks a Supreme Court revolution. Senate hearings have one job: to block it. [August 2005] The Wrong Litmus Test by Robert B. Reich Yes, abortion is important. But the next Supreme Court justice...

Devil in the Details

They Want Your TV As current law has it, the residents of the 16 million American households that still rely on over-the-air broadcasts as their only source of television will awaken on January 1, 2007, to nothing but a snowy screen, as the channels they've relied on for decades all suddenly stop broadcasting. The looming turnoff is the result of a mid-1990s effort to spur the manufacture of high-definition televisions by providing consumers with something to watch. The idea was to give, free of charge, every television broadcaster a second band of frequency on the radio spectrum to be used for digital broadcasts. In response to criticism that this constituted an extraordinarily large giveaway, the gift was made a temporary one: In 2007 the broadcasters must give back the extra spectrum and move exclusively to digital signals. In practice, nobody expects Congress to actually go through with the plan. Access to free television is, as one telecom analyst puts it, “the real third rail of...

Dossier: Back to School

The percentage of schools that during the 2002–03 school year flunked the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards set by the No Child Left Behind Act were 5 percent in Alabama, 14 percent in Wyoming, 40 percent in Illinois, and 76 percent in Florida … 99 percent of California schools are projected to fail proficiency tests after subjected to 12 years of NCLB policies … Texas claimed a 91-percent proficiency rate in mathematics among eighth-graders before the NCLB assessment … after AYP standards were put into place, Texas had a proficiency rate of only 24 percent … In 2004, several schools in Houston were found to have falsified drop-out rates to receive bonuses of $5,000 for principals … The man in charge of the district, Rod Paige, became President Bush's first-term secretary of education, and Houston became the model for the NCLB … Since the NCLB was signed into law in 2002, appropriations have been more and more scarce , shortchanging the legislation by $4.2 billion in 2002, $5.4...

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