Anabel Lee

Anabel Lee is an editorial intern at the Prospect.

Recent Articles

THE IRAQI JUDICIARY FINDS SOMEONE WE DON'T LIKE INNOCENT? NO PROBLEM, WE CAN JAIL THEM ANYWAY.

After two years and one day of being detained by the U.S. military, Associated Press photographer Bilal Hussein was granted full amnesty by an Iraqi judicial panel yesterday. The panel unanimously decided to drop the last remaining criminal charge against the photographer, which concerned allegedly improper contacts he had with insurgents who murdered an Italian citizen, and it ordered Hussein "released immediately." Earlier last week the panel also dismissed terrorism-related charges brought against Hussein by the U.S. military, including those that claimed he had bomb-making materials, colluded with insurgents to take photos coordinated with an explosion, and offered to acquire a forged I.D. for a terrorist wanted by the military. Since being detained by Marines on April 12, 2006, 70 miles west of Baghdad, Hussein has maintained his innocence and that he was doing only what was required of him as a photojournalist in a conflict zone. The week's judicial decisions fall under an...

MORE HABEAS QUESTIONS FOR THE COURT.

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments earlier today for two consolidated custody cases: Munaf v. Geren and Geren v. Omar . (I blogged about them last week .) In these cases, the Court will assess the Bush administration's assertion that the U.S.' participation in a multinational force -- even one dominated and led by American forces -- precludes U.S. citizens who are detained by U.S. military officials from filing habeas petitions in the United States. The government's argument -- delivered by the Department of Justice Deputy Solicitor General Gregory Garre -- rests on the Hirota v. MacArthur case of 1948, in which Japanese citizens detained in Japan by the Allied Powers, which were under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, filed a habeas petition directly with the Supreme Court; the Court decided that it could not adjudicate this petition since the tribunal that convicted and sentenced the petitioners was not a U.S. tribunal. There are, however, two important differences...

NOW THE U.N. MATTERS?

During a conference call late yesterday afternoon, lawyers at the Brennan Center for Justice briefed the press on the details of two upcoming Supreme Court cases, Geren v. Omar and Munaf v. Geren . These so-called "war on terror cases" are what Jonathan Hafetz of the Brennan Center called "yet another chapter in the story of the administration's attempts to avoid judicial review, to avoid access to courts, and to create a prison beyond the law." The cases of Shawqi Omar and Mohammad Munaf present the constitutional question of whether or not American citizens who are seized and detained abroad have the same fundamental rights as U.S. citizens arrested at home. Both men have been detained by the United States in Iraq for more than two years without judicial review or due process. Omar had moved to Iraq looking for work as a contract worker in construction; since being seized in 2004, he has been held in Abu Ghraib and other U.S. detention facilities. The U.S. government has also said...

CHIEF EXECUTIVES IN THE HOUSE.

Last Friday morning, Rep. Henry Waxman 's House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform held its second hearing on executive compensation, which featured the testimonies (and interrogation) of three American financial giants -- CEO of Countrywide Financial Corporation Angelo Mozilo , former CEO of Merrill Lynch E. Stanley O'Neal , and former CEO of Citigroup Charles Prince . The subject was major financial institutions' roles in the sub-prime mortgage mess. In his opening statement, Ranking Minority Member Tom Davis asked that the hearing not degenerate into a hunt for scapegoats, and then went on to make the bizarre remark, "Punishing individual corporate executives with public floggings like this may be a politically satisfying ritual -- like an island tribe sacrificing a virgin to a grumbling volcano." But scapegoats and virgins these three are not. Since CEOs are guaranteed outsized severance and separation packages regardless of how they or their firms actually perform, they...

Justice Denied for Battered Immigrant Women

The Department of Homeland Security is considering a policy change that would harm immigrant women who are abused by husbands who are U.S. citizens.

Monica Bejar, 37, lived in fear for over a decade. She came to the U.S. from Mexico illegally in 1989, and shortly thereafter married a permanent resident who turned violent and started drinking heavily during their first year of marriage. Over the years, her husband would offer to set her immigration papers straight, only to rip up the forms during bouts of rage. "He would betray me all the time so I was afraid, not so much to go back to Mexico because I have family there, but to lose my children," Bejar recalled. "I was always afraid that because he was legal here that he would take them away from me." Finally in 2004, Bejar began petitioning for lawful immigration status under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and was approved. She now owns her own business, and her three daughters feel more secure knowing their mother will always be nearby. But in the future, women with Bejar's experience might not be able to seek the same relief under VAWA. In yet another example of how...

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