Aswini Anburajan

Aswini Anburajan is a writer for Feet in 2 Worlds, an ethnic media reporting project supported by the Center for New York City Affairs at the New School.

Recent Articles

The Hill Lists Questions Peter King Should Have Asked...

Faiza Patel , an attorney for the Brennan Center for Justice, writes a piece for The Hill that lists a series of questions that were worthy of asking at Peter King's hearings yesterday. Chief among them, Patel says, is whether the right to worship and pursue an active religious life is being associated with a potential for terrorism. Finally, we should have an accounting of current anti-radicalization measures, evaluating their coherence, effectiveness, and consonance with our shared constitutional values. The FBI’s approach would seem to justify monitoring religious behavior. And, despite denials from its director, there is mounting evidence that the FBI is placing informants in mosques simply to find out what the imam and those who worship there are saying. The Bureau should explain how this approach comports with First Amendment values of free speech, association, and religion. Equally important, the FBI should make clear how keeping tabs on American Muslims’ religious beliefs...

Media Smackdown

The feud between old and new media just got personal with Ariana Huffington lashing back at Bill Keller , executive editor of The New York Times , for a piece that will appear in this Sunday's New York Times Magazine . In the piece Keller dismisses the reporting of the Huffington Post as one that involves slide shows of "cute kittens" and claims that Huffington plagiarized his comments from a panel on the future of journalism. How great is Huffington's instinctive genius for aggregation? I once sat beside her on a panel in Los Angeles (on -- what else? -- The Future of Journalism). I had come prepared with a couple of memorized riffs on media topics, which I duly presented. Afterward we sat down for a joint interview with a local reporter. A moment later I heard one of my riffs issuing verbatim from the mouth of Ms. Huffington. I felt so... aggregated. Huffington came back swinging, showing several instances where she used the comment she made to the press well before the panel she...

Greek Americans Buy Greece's Debt

The Wall Street Journal Europe reports that Greece is turning to its diasporic community to buy up its debt, issuing bonds. The piece quotes Greek Americans, from the unemployed to cafe owners in Astoria, all saying they'll pony up money largely for the sake of ancestral pride. Greece wants to sell 3 billion Euros in bonds to its diasporic community. The Greek American population is estimated to be around 2.5 million people. Canada and Australia are also said to have large populations. Both Israel and India have used bonds to target expatriates before and have an elaborate system of ensuring that those that left don't forget those who were left behind. There's Birthright Israel for young Jewish Americans, and a recently instated "Overseas Citizen of India" targeted toward older Indian Americans who travel frequently back and forth from the motherland to the U.S. In Mexico, remittances from the United States make up the second largest source of foreign money in the country, after oil...

How Many "States" Does America Really Have?

The Atlantic features an amazing graphic showing the division of the US of A into 12 separate economic states, stressing the idea that the country is turning into areas of haves and have nots. It's a strong divide in the sense that poverty is surrounded by poverty, creating an entire regional ecosystem that's mired in problems. Worth checking out to see how America looks from a macro perspective.

Curbing Speculation

Chris Hayes writes in The Nation that gas prices might be a defining factor in Obama 's re-election. Anyone doubting that just needs to cast their memory back to 2008 when the call for a repeal of the gas tax became a signature issue for John McCain in tackling the nation's gas woes. Hayes points out that then, as now, speculation played a huge role: In the wake of the price explosion in the summer of 2008, a bubble that extended to all kinds of commodities, including copper and wheat, a number of observers from George Soros to Hedge Fund manager Michael Masters to former Commodities Future Trading Commission staffer and derivatives expert Michael Greenberg concluded that the underlying supply-and-demand fundamentals couldn't account for the sharp rise in prices. In the first six months of 2008, U.S. economic output was declining while global supply was increasing. And even if supply and demand were, over the long run, pushing the price of oil up, that alone couldn't explain the...

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