Aura Bogado

Aura Bogado is a writer based in Los Angeles. She has written for The Guardian, Teen Vogue, Mother Jones, and The Nation.

Recent Articles

One Way to Stop -- or at Least Impede -- That Wall

Los Angeles may target border wall profiteering with contractor disclosure requirement

Ronen Tivony/Sipa via AP Images
Ronen Tivony/Sipa via AP Images Demonstrators during an anti-Trump Not My President's Day rally in Los Angeles. Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. I f you’re bidding to build the border wall, the City of Los Angeles may soon want to know about it. In the latest effort by blue cities to resist President Trump’s anti-immigrant policies, a Los Angeles City Council member announced Thursday that he will introduce a motion requiring city contractors to disclose whether they're bidding or working on Donald Trump’s border wall – or risk stiff fines and penalties. The motion is the first of its kind, but follows a trend of major cities exercising their authority to oppose the wall. Los Angeles is home to more than 1.5 million immigrants. Voters in the county voted more than three to one for Hillary Clinton; the president’s policies remain unpopular here,...

Fire and ICE: Hiding in Plain Sight

How the ever-present fear of detention punctuates life for undocumented immigrants

Aura Bogado
Aura Bogado Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. I t’s Monday afternoon in Bellflower, a small suburb in southeastern Los Angeles County, California. Juana, 34, and a neighbor from her apartment complex are watching their sons. (All names in this story have been changed to protect undocumented people's identities.) It’s one of Juana’s two days off per week from the luxury hotel she works at in Beverly Hills as a housekeeper. The two boys, both three years old, are playing on the couch in the small living room that doubles as a dining area, with a kitchen tucked into a corner. Aside from helping watch over the children, Juana’s neighbor holds a gaze through an opening in the front window curtain, and eventually spots someone outside. “That’s the man with the gas company,” she tells Juana in Spanish. “It’s fine if you want to open the door when he...