Brentin Mock

Brentin Mock is lead reporter for Voting Rights Watch, a partnership between Colorlines.com and The Nation magazine. Over the past year, he covered the voter-ID law controversy, felony disenfranchisement, voter intimidation and challenges to the Voting Rights Act.

Recent Articles

EPA ENDANGERMENT FINDING ANNOUNCED WITH ENVIRONMENTAL-JUSTICE EMPHASIS.

In following with the Supreme Court decision Massachusetts v. EPA handed down in April of 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed that greenhouse gases are air pollutants, under the Clean Air Act, that instigate climate change and thus endanger health and public welfare. Under this finding, the EPA is poised to regulate carbon-dioxide emissions from new cars at the very least, and likely power plants as well. Regulations are more likely to come from legislative action, but either way regulations would take months, if not years to implement.

Notable in the statement released from the EPA today is an environmental-justice emphasis:

RELIGION AND BLACK THOUGHT ON GLOBAL WARMING.

Survey results from the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life released yesterday revealed that black Protestants, white evangelicals, and Catholics are more skeptical than the average American on the causes of global warming. While 47 percent of the U.S. population believes there's strong evidence that warming has mostly anthropogenic causes, just 34 percent of evangelicals surveyed believed the same, followed by 39 percent of black Protestants, and 44 percent of white Catholics. Those unaffiliated with religion and white mainline Protestants were much more likely to believe that warming was mostly man-made.

EPA'S LISA JACKSON TO INDUSTRY: YOUR FEARS WON'T COME SOON ENOUGH.

The Environmental Protection Agency's proposal that global warming endangers public health and welfare cleared the White House's review process earlier this week. Carbon-emitting industries have long feared the day when they'd finally be held accountable for their release of heat-trapping gases, and now they're especially spooked.

Outside Activism, Reconsidered

Have outsiders helped or hindered the Gulf Coast's recovery? Six activists discuss the influx of post-Katrina volunteers and their role in the rebuilding process.

In her March column, "The Trouble with Outside Activists," Courtney Martin asked if the flood of outside activists in the wake of Katrina was hurting as much as it helped. "Like Juan Ponce DeLeon's mythological fountain of youth, the Lower 9th Ward has become upper-middle-class America's source of feel-good absolution," she wrote. "But the darker side of all of this well-intentioned activism is that it has created a revolving door of services and support in a parish that is in dire need of a strategic plan."

NAPOLITANO MISSES ESSENCE OF NEW ORLEANS PROBLEM.

This past Friday, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano was interviewed by Essence.com's Cynthia Gordy -- a member of that curiosity seen among the Washington press corps these days that's referred to as the "Black News Media" -- about progress in New Orleans' post-Katrina recovery.

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