Dana Goldstein

Dana Goldstein, a former associate editor and writer at the Prospect, comes from a family of public school educators. She received the Spencer Fellowship in Education Journalism, a Schwarz Fellowship at the New America Foundation, and a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellowship at the Nation Institute. Her journalism is regularly featured in SlateThe AtlanticThe NationThe Daily Beast, and other publications, and she is a staff writer at the Marshall Project. 

Recent Articles

With Every New Program, DOE Further Ignores School Segregation.

I've been writing frequently here about the Race to the Top program, in which the Department of Education will reward a total of $4.3 billion to a few handpicked states -- those who plan to focus on a reform agenda of teacher merit pay, charter school expansion, national curriculum standards, and test-based accountability. This week, the DOE rolled out regulations for its second high-profile grant competition, " Investing in Innovation ," or i3. This $650 million fund will be awarded to local districts and nonprofits committed to the same agenda promoted by Race to the Top. For i3, though, the entities that receive the grants must also arrange for a 20 percent private sector matching contribution, typically from either a foundation or corporation. On Sept. 24, when Secretary Arne Duncan finally admitted, in a big speech , that "many" American children remain racially segregated at school, and "we must work together to change that," I hoped the DOE would consider using Race to the Top...

Real Numbers on Domestic and Sexual Violence.

I've noticed that every time I write about domestic violence -- whether the topic is Rihanna or insurance companies classifying abuse as a pre-existing condition -- "men's rights" trolls come out of the woodwork to claim there is no proof women are more likely to be victimized by intimate partners than men. "Dana, why are you a sexist pig?" wrote one unhinged commenter . "You know that domestic violence [ sic ] anywhere from 30-60% male victims depending on the research." This claim fails the sniff test and defies common sense. It's also factually untrue. Last week the Justice Department released its latest National Crimes Victimization Survey, which features a special section on female victims of violence . The survey included 76,000 households, and while domestic violence is infamously underreported, the report does sketch out the contours of the problem. First, the good news: On the whole, domestic violence is down between 1993 and 2008. But unsurprisingly, women remain over five...

Could the John Edwards Scandal Get Any Grosser?

The latest sordid details in the John Edwards saga are supplied today by Ben Smith : Edwards expected diet Cokes to be delivered into his hand, just by silently raising it. And way more weirdness: When John Edwards returned to North Carolina in the course of his long quest for the presidency, Andrew Young always met him at the airport in Edwards’s big black Chevy Tahoe. Young drove, and Edwards rode shotgun, silently raising his left hand whenever he wanted a Diet Coke, which Young would wordlessly supply. When Edwards and his family arrived home, Young had made sure there was fresh milk in the fridge, a neatly trimmed lawn and neatly folded dry cleaning. When he arranged their vacation to Disney World in 2004, he naturally booked himself a ticket. And when Edwards’s mistress became pregnant, Young — at the cost of his reputation, his wife’s and his minister father’s — stepped forward to say the child was his. Speaking of jobs , my ego just couldn't handle being a political aide. --...

Did Someone Say "Opt-out?"

The Washington Post and New York Times are having a little spat today about "opting-out." The Post ran a front-page story by Donna St. George proclaiming, "obsession with high-achieving professional mothers sidelining careers for family life is largely beside the point." The Times ' David Leonhardt jumped in to defend his colleague Lisa Belkin , author of the original, blockbuster Times Magazine feature on the "opt-out revolution." The opt-out trend is real, Leonhardt writes: The Labor Department numbers, for instance, show the percentage of women 25 to 34 in the labor force peaked at 77 percent in 1999. This percentage had risen in every decade from the 1940s through the 1990s. But it has stopped rising. It was 75 percent last month and has not been above 76 percent since 2001. If you focus on the highly educated women who have been the subject of much of the discussion, you see something similar. A paper in the American Economic Review last year by Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz...

What Makes TAP Different?

If you read TAPPED, you ought to be donating or subscribing to The American Prospect . There's no such thing as a free lunch! But in case that's not enough to move you, here are five more reasons to give to TAP : 1. We let our writers tweet. 2. We started the careers of Ezra Klein , Matt Yglesias , and Josh Marshall . And by reading TAP now, you can say you knew Adam Serwer and Tim Fernholz (and me !) way back when. 3. We care about labor issues. Most newspapers and newsweeklies no longer cover organized labor. Here at TAP , our expertise and commitment are unmatched. Read Harold Meyerson , Dean Baker , and our recent special report, " Decent Work, Living Wages ." 4. We are feminist. Other publications have a women's-only blog. At TAP , we're 100 percent integrated, 100 percent of the time. 5. We take public policy seriously. We aren't Politico . When you read TAP , you actually come away with a deeper understanding of why the public option matters , the latest strategies for...

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