Dana Goldstein

Dana Goldstein, a former associate editor and writer at the Prospect, comes from a family of public school educators. She received the Spencer Fellowship in Education Journalism, a Schwarz Fellowship at the New America Foundation, and a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellowship at the Nation Institute. Her journalism is regularly featured in SlateThe AtlanticThe NationThe Daily Beast, and other publications, and she is a staff writer at the Marshall Project. 

Recent Articles

JEWS: POLAND::NATIVE AMERICANS:USA?

JEWS: POLAND::NATIVE AMERICANS:USA? In a New York Times article about the fetishization of Jewish holidays, music, and food in Poland -- a nation where 10 percent of the population was Jewish prior to the Holocaust but where now only 10,000 Jews live -- the founder of a Polish-Jewish magazine explains, "It’s like when you lose a limb. Poland is suffering from Jewish phantom pain.” This idea of "phantom pain" or guilt reminds me of how the United States has appropriated a certain vision of Native American culture. We name our sports teams after tribes and turn Native people into face-painted mascots. We consecrate a holiday (Thanksgiving) that ignores most historical evidence to mythologize non-coercive friendship between European settlers and Native Americans. In the town where I grew up , where the local Sint Sinck tribe was displaced by white settlers into the Connecticut River valley, a middle class neighborhood of Cape Cods is referred to as "Indian Village," with street names...

Dr. Yes-Man

Dr. James Holsinger doesn't inspire confidence that, if confirmed as surgeon general, he would stand up to Bush's ideological pressure.

Dr. James Holsinger talks during a news conference in this December 2003 file photo. He is currently Bush's nominee for surgeon general. (AP Photo/Patti Longmire, File)
"I've had the rare opportunity to live my life in the company of a remarkable group of women," Dr. James Holsinger, the former chief medical director of the Veterans Health Administration, told a Senate committee yesterday morning. The soft-spoken Kentucky cardiologist, who President Bush has nominated as surgeon general, gestured toward his 98 year old mother, his wife, and their four daughters, all in attendance. Later, when Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland asked Holsinger if he had changed since the early 1990s, when he resisted accountability at the VHA even after female vets reported a lack of access to care and staffers at an Atlanta hospital were found guilty of egregious sexual harassment, Holsinger responded with the non sequitur, "I have mentored women throughout the past 15 years. There are a number of women who come to me because they feel I am willing to do that. ... I have the joy of working with them on a daily basis." Greeted outside the Dirksen Senate Office Building...

MORE GOOD NEWS...

MORE GOOD NEWS FROM THE SUN-TIMES . As J. noted earlier , the Chicago Sun-Times has made the rare decision to explicitly shift left on its editorial page. In another good move, the Sun-Times will begin publishing signed editorials, so readers know which member of the board wrote each piece. The New York Times website now provides a meet-the-editorial board page with detailed descriptions of each member's area of expertise. You can play a fun guessing game identifying which author wrote any given editorial. So why not go all the way and include a byline? --Dana Goldstein

BILL CLINTON, ACTIVIST.

BILL CLINTON, ACTIVIST. You don't need to earn earn hundreds of thousands of dollars per speaking engagement to influence hearts and minds! You just need to read Giving: How Each Of Us Can Change The World , a new book by Clinton due in September and based on his inspirational speeches. In other Bill news, the former president says his preferred title come January 2009 would be " First Laddie ." --Dana Goldstein

BUSH POLITICS AND PUBLIC HEALTH.

BUSH POLITICS AND PUBLIC HEALTH. Two days before the Senate is set to hold confirmation hearings for Dr. James W. Holsinger , the anti-gay Kentucky cardiologist who's been nominated to be surgeon general, former Surgeon General Richard Carmona told Congress the Bush administration banned him from speaking publicly about stem cell research, emergency contraception, sex ed, mental health, global health, and other issues. He was pressured not to attend the Special Olympics because of the event's ties to the Kennedy family. I kid you not. The job of surgeon general is to be “the doctor of the nation” -- not “the doctor of a political party,” said Carmona, a Bush appointee. --Dana Goldstein

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