Dana Goldstein

Dana Goldstein, a former associate editor and writer at the Prospect, comes from a family of public school educators. She received the Spencer Fellowship in Education Journalism, a Schwarz Fellowship at the New America Foundation, and a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellowship at the Nation Institute. Her journalism is regularly featured in SlateThe AtlanticThe NationThe Daily Beast, and other publications, and she is a staff writer at the Marshall Project. 

Recent Articles

The Real GOP Health Care Plan: Be Rich.

At TNR , Marin Cogan has a good, short profile of Alan Grayson , the freshman Democrat from Florida who announced on the House floor yesterday that the GOP's health care plan is: "Don't get sick. And if you do get sick, die quickly." He even used flashcards. Grayson seems a little unhinged here, and that's too bad -- his theatrics remind me of covering my university's student government for the campus paper. But Grayson's opinions in favor of financial regulation and in opposition to escalation in Afghanistan and Iraq are coherent and progressive. I liked Grayson's effort to recommend constitutional education for the nation's high school seniors. My slogan for the GOP health care platform would me more like this: Be rich. If you want an abortion, be rich ! If you want to avoid bankruptcy in the event of a catastrophic car accident, be rich ! -- Dana Goldstein

When the Recession Ends, What Will Happen to Women Workers?

Note to The New York Times : The correct term for referring to the incorrect notion that this recession primarily affects men is "hecession," not "mancession." In any case, on the paper's Economix blog today, Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago writes that although women's labor force participation has inched up to 49.9 percent since the recession hit, it doesn't mean that women are about to surpass men in the labor force permanently. Why? Mulligan explains that men have been struggling during the recession because of the loss of construction and manufacturing jobs, but that it still takes unemployed men and women about the same time to find a new position after they've been laid off. In other words, women are not suddenly becoming more desirable workers to hire. Rather, certain gender-segregated industries have taken an especially hard hit, leaving more men than women looking for a new job. Mulligan predicts that women's labor-force participation will fall when we pull out of...

Quote of the Day: Chuck Grassley Edition.

As expected, the Senate Finance Committee just rejected the Rockefeller amendment to include a public option in its health reform bill. During the debate, Chuck Grassley said : The government is not a fair competitor. It's a predator. The argument that the public option will kill the private insurance market is bunk: The public option would have to support itself from the premiums and co-pays it brings in from customers -- just as private plans do. And in many other nations, like France, there is a robust private insurance industry that coexists with a universal health care system, in which government guarantees free basic health care. The Dutch model is similar to what some Democrats have in mind. But putting that aside, it's just really perverse to claim that government is the "predator" in this debate, when we know the havoc the insurance industry is wreaking on American lives: C-sections and domestic violence considered "pre-existing conditions"; annual and lifetime caps on...

The Final Word on Roman Polanski.

Eugene Robinson : ...there was certainly no artistic merit in the crime he acknowledged committing: During a photo shoot at the Los Angeles home of his friend and "Chinatown" star Jack Nicholson, Polanski plied a 13-year-old girl with champagne and drugs and had sex with her. That is grotesque. In general, I agree with the European view that Americans tend to be prudish and hypocritical about sex. But a grown man drugging and raping a 13-year-old girl? That's not remotely a close call. It's wrong in any moral universe -- and deserves harsher punishment than three decades of gilded exile. -- Dana Goldstein

White House to Dems: Deal With Abortion on Your Own.

Bad news for those of us who've been hoping President Obama would confront members of Congress who are using abortion to delay health reform: The Times reports that Obama called anti-choice Democrat Bart Stupak -- who has sworn to beat back any bill that includes even private plans that cover abortion -- and told him to work the issue out within the Democratic Party. The problem is, the White House has given no indication as to what "working it out" should look like. Should women who receive insurance affordability subsidies be denied access to every health plan covering abortion? (Currently, most employer-provided plans do offer some abortion coverage, so this would be a radical shift.) That's what Stupak and his allies would like to see. They aren't satisfied with provisions that would simply prevent public funds from paying for abortions, by segregating the public money from private premiums and co-pays. Stupak's logic follows that of the Hyde Amendment, which already prevents...

Pages