David Dayen

David Dayen is a contributing writer to Salon.com who also writes for The InterceptThe New Republic, and The Fiscal Times. His first book, Chain of Title, about three ordinary Americans who uncover Wall Street's foreclosure fraud, was released by The New Press on May 17, 2016.

Recent Articles

Tesla Workers File Charges with National Labor Board as Battle with Elon Musk Intensifies

Employees fight back as Tesla ramps up anti-union policies.

AP Photo/Jeff Chiu
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu Tesla employees at the company's Fremont, California, factory. Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. W orkers at Tesla’s Fremont, California, electric car factory have filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), accusing the company of illegal surveillance, coercion, intimidation, and prevention of worker communications. The employees, who have been attempting to organize the approximately 7,000 workers at the plant through the United Auto Workers, claim that Tesla violated multiple sections of the National Labor Relations Act, which protects the right to unionize. “I know my rights, and I know that we acted within them,” said Jonathan Galescu, a body repair technician. Galescu and his colleagues have previously cited low pay, hazardous work conditions, and a culture of intimidation as...

Janet Yellen’s Secret Weapon Against Wall Street Deregulation

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has a rare opportunity to change the culture of the nation’s central bank when she picks a successor to outgoing general counsel Scott Alvarez.

AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File
AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen oversees an open meeting in Washington. T here will be few moments over the next four years where the opportunity exists to dramatically improve financial regulation. But one of these moments just presented itself, and it must not be squandered. The Federal Reserve announced Wednesday that Scott Alvarez, general counsel for the central bank, will retire after 36 years of service. Nicknamed the “ eighth governor ” of the Fed, Alvarez has since 2004 held the general counsel slot, a critical regulatory and legal policy position. He represents one of the last links to the reign of former chairman Alan Greenspan. And he shares Greenspan’s antipathy to regulation, a toxic attitude that literally helped usher in the 2008 financial crisis. At the Fed, the nation’s most important banking regulator, Alvarez participated in virtually every deregulatory maneuver of the past 35 years. He was there when the Fed refused to regulate...

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