David Englin

David L. Englin is a military officer stationed in Washington, D.C. His views are his own and in no way reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Recent Articles

Double Duty

The 40 million Americans without health insurance are 40 million chinks in our nation's biological armor; 40 million opportunities for anthrax, smallpox or some yet unknown form of biological warfare to breech our defenses and put the security of the United States at risk. How can we hold the line and secure the American people from biological attack? Universal health care, that's how. Arguing the national security merits of universal health care is both good policy and good politics. But advocates must, in particular, make the biowarfare case for universal health care if they want it to be an effective electoral issue in 2004 -- and if they want to someday see an America in which every person has normal access to basic care. There are two ways to deal with a biological attack: prevent the initial release of the biological weapon or detect the attack and minimize its effects. As we saw during the post-September 11 anthrax attacks, even when on high alert it is next to impossible for...

Number Crunching

"We will defend it because it is truth, and you can't deny truth," said Chief Justice Roy Moore of the Alabama Supreme Court, explaining why he had erected a two-and-a-half-ton monument of the Ten Commandments in the Alabama State Judicial Building's rotunda. On everything from the war on terrorism to human reproduction to school vouchers, the mouthpieces of the religious right -- like Moore -- have a habit of claiming for themselves unique knowledge of God's will. And when it comes to displaying the Ten Commandments in government buildings, they also seem to claim unique knowledge of God's laws, deciding for all Judeo-Christian believers which Ten Commandments constitute undeniable truth. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson ruled that "Roy's Rock" is an unconstitutional government monument to "the Judeo-Christian God, and, in particular, to his sovereignty over all the affairs of men." But even as he pointedly chastised Moore for his theocratic vision of American...

Cure for War Fever

Gen. Douglas MacArthur was nothing if not a hawk -- but he also clearly understood that the Americans who suffer most when our country goes to war are the men and women who fight. "The soldier above all others prays for peace," he once said, "for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war." At a time when the dogs of war are once again barking loudly -- having turned their noses from Afghanistan to Iraq over the last several months -- the American people find themselves increasingly disconnected from the men and women in uniform who "bear the deepest wounds and scars" when their elected officials opt for war. In a political reality where preemptive military force has moved from option to doctrine and where Congress has formally given the president wide latitude to turn doctrine into action, the will of the American people stands as the last restraint on our national might. It is therefore dangerous for the voters and leaders of the world's foremost...