Denis MacShane

Denis MacShane was a Labour MP for Rotherham from 1994 to 2012, and was Minister for Europe in Tony Blair's government. His 2015 book predicted the vote for British exit from the E.U. and his new book is Brexit No Exit: Why (in the End) Britain Won’t Leave Europe.

Recent Articles

The Powerlessness of Power: Politics in Britain Today

In the aftermath of an inconclusive election, the United Kingdom faces a prolonged political stalemate and lost confidence in government.

(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
(AP Photo/Matt Dunham) T welve months after the Brexit plebiscite, and two weeks after the general election, British politics has no direction, no sense of purpose, and no commanding personalities. The classic institutions of the state—the civil service, big business, the media, the professions, the intellectuals, the trade unions, the churches, the very people themselves—feel powerless and unable to control what is happening and where Britain should go. Normally in a democracy, a national election such as produced a President Trump or a President Macron would answer the question. But Britain has had four major elections in under four years—two referendums on Scotland and on Europe, and two general elections—and no one in the nation knows what the people want. It does mean, however, that there will be no early rush to a new election. I have met with Tory peers and members of parliament, and they are quite clear that they will not support any early election. The Conservatives have a...

Do Europeans Do It Better?

We can learn a lot from European labor policy, but beware naive Sweden-envy.

L abor policy in the United States has been marked by two self defeating attitudes. First, while public policy prescribes a ritualized system of collective bargaining, in most substantive areas policy is silent or reactive, allowing employers broad discretion over work organization, worker training, and incomes policy. At the same time, labor and business leaders are consumed by an us-versus-them mentality in which there can be only one winner. Labor policies in other countries suggest how a labor movement can be stronger yet at the same time more friendly to a high-wage, highe-productivity path. That path, in turn, can offer new ways to revive the labor movement. American corporate culture is now strongly influenced from overseas, from Japanese "just-in-time" production systems to the marketing standards set by the Italian retailer Benetton. An Irishman runs that quintessential American company, Heinz, while an Australian (Rupert Murdoch) runs America's most successful media empire...