Dorian Friedman

Dorian Friedman is The American Prospect's director of external affairs.

Recent Articles

MORE FROM CONNECTICUT.

MORE FROM CONNECTICUT. At Stratford�s Frank Scott Bunnell High School this morning, those who stopped to share their views spoke with plain, if surprisingly unsentimental, conviction about their choice. �I�ve lived through too many wars, and I want my two young grandsons to have the same opportunity to vote that I�m exercising today,� said Susan Delbene , a professor of nursing at New York�s Pace University who wearily returned to her Connecticut condo at ten o�clock last night so she could vote against incumbent Joe Lieberman this morning. Apart from his stubborn support for the Iraq War, Lieberman has �greatly taken Connecticut voters for granted,� underestimating their intelligence and exploiting their good will for too long, she believes. As if on cue, voter Bob David stepped from Bunnell�s lobby into the sparkling midday sun, quickly separating his feuding sons, aged 3 and 5. �Enough,� he scolded. �We�re not warring Republicans, you guys!� David, a fiber-optics executive and...

Mommy Diarist

On a recent afternoon, Judith Warner -- author of the best-selling Hillary Clinton: The Inside Story and a former special correspondent for Newsweek in Paris -- is sipping organic tea in her sunroom while reflecting on her forthcoming book, Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety (Riverhead). She talks with Dorian Friedman about The Feminine Mystique , French women, and modern motherhood in America. Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique clearly informed your writing. Is your book in some ways its intellectual successor? I didn't see it so much that way as aspired to it. When I began the research for the book, I was spending a lot of time with stay-at-home moms. Hearing the way they talked about their lives and looking at the effect of not working, so much of it reminded me of Friedan's observations [from 1963] -- that sort of vague, indefinable feeling of emptiness and unhappiness and anxiety and angst. I found myself digging out my old copy of The Feminine Mystique to see...

Bipartisanship Remembered

Amid the clatter over “saving” Social Security, it's instructive to look back 22 years -- to a time when an imperiled program was saved by a true bipartisan compromise. Then, as now, a newly emboldened GOP was rewriting the agenda in Washington. But then, unlike now, each side sacrificed for long-term gain. As the 1980s dawned, a mix of high inflation, slow growth, and a benefits-indexing anomaly left the system fast approaching insolvency. For several years prior, Social Security had been “borrowing” against its own trust funds -- eventually even raiding the Medicare and disability accounts -- to pay retirees' monthly benefits. Ronald Reagan had barely settled into the White House when budget czar David Stockman warned of “the most devastating bankruptcy in history” unless Congress acted with haste. Reagan named a national commission, chaired by Alan Greenspan and including Democrats Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Claude Pepper; Republicans Bob Dole and John Heinz; Bob Ball, Social Security...

Business: Ally or Obstacle?

By now, the stirring images are familiar to television viewers: teary-eyed father recounting beloved child's battle with life-threatening illness … child enjoying miraculous recovery thanks to world-class health care at Mayo Clinic … grateful dad's glowing tribute to beneficent employer for picking up tab, supporting family values, and investing in hard-pressed workers like him. The sponsor? Wal-Mart, epitome of the low-wage economy. Wal-Mart offers health insurance, but the premiums and co-pays are so high that most workers don't take it. Wal-Mart does maximize the publicity value of the fortunate few. Broad cynicism about corporate motives and chronic anxiety about job insecurity and stagnant wages leave Americans wondering whether businesses can be trusted to value ordinary workers. A generation ago, a job with a very large company usually meant good wages and benefits. When the nation's economy was dominated by oligarchic corporations, often with stronger unions or government...