Ezra Klein

Ezra Klein is a staff reporter at The Washington Post. You can read his blogging here. His work has appeared in the LA Times, The Guardian, The Washington Monthly, The New Republic, Slate, and The Columbia Journalism Review. He's been a commentator on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, and more.

Recent Articles

BAILOUT MATH.

Felix Salmon writes:

When the government announced its stress tests on February 23, Bank of America stock closed at $3.91 a share. At that level, if the government converted $34 billion of preferred stock into common equity, it would have received 8.7 billion shares in Bank of America. There are 6.4 billion shares outstanding right now, which means the government would have ended up with a controlling 58% stake in the company.

BIG CUTS, SMALL PLATES.

Peter Orszag lists off a couple of the programs the administration is eliminating. Included among them is this winner of an expenditure:

Educational attaché, Paris, France ($632,000). The Department of Education can use e-mail, video conferencing, and modest travel to replace a full-time representative to UNESCO in Paris, France.

CAN LOCAL BLOGGERS REPLACE LOCAL NEWS COVERAGE?

todays_local_news.jpg"Not only is it going to be intrinsically difficult to ever find a viable revenue model for paying a reporter to cover the zoning board if people don’t want to read about the zoning board," writes Matt Yglesias, "[but] I’m not actually sure how much social value is created by unread articles about zoning boards.

BAUCUS ON CAP AND TRADE: "COSTS OF INACTION WOULD BE FAR GREATER."

The Senate Finance Committee is holding hearings on cap and trade today. And Baucus starts it off with a nice point. "Action would not be without cost," he admits. "But the costs of inaction would be far greater."

HAPPY BUDGET DAY!

That's how Obama's aides are signing their e-mails today. And why not? It's a big day! The full budget! "Financial information on individual programs and appropriation accounts"! "The proposed text of appropriations language"! Extremely trivial cuts that the administration is nevertheless selling as a painful effort in belt-tightening. Join the fun!

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