Gabriel Arana

Gabriel Arana is a senior editor at The American Prospect. His articles on gay rights, immigration, and media have appeared in publications including The New Republic, The Nation, Salon, The Advocate, and The Daily Beast.

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Recent Articles

Obama Gets the Wrong Message on Immigration.

It seems like the Obama administration got the wrong message when it came to the Arizona immigration bill. Instead of pushing back against the state's enforcement-only approach to dealing with illegal immigration, the administration has sent 1,200 National Guard troops to help "secure the border." Maybe this shouldn't be surprising given that progressives at major think tanks like the Center for American Progress have lately joined Republicans in calling for the border to be militarized, but looking at the numbers, you wonder how anyone could think we need more border enforcement.

The Little Picture: No H8 Marches On.

prop8.jpg

One year ago today, the California Supreme Court upheld Proposition 8, banning gay marriage in the state – though the marriage licenses of 18,000 couples remained valid. Closing arguments for the federal challenge, Perry v. Schwarzeneggar, are slated for June 16.

(Flickr/albany_tim)

DADT Repeal: Not an HRC Victory.

As Paul mentioned this morning, a "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" repeal appears imminent.

Powerless in Arizona

How did such a draconian anti-immigration bill pass in a state where the population is 30 percent Hispanic?

The May Day immigrant-rights rally at the Seattle Center. (Flickr/Brittney Bush)

Nogales, Arizona's largest city on the Mexican border, is situated about 70 miles south of Tucson, along a desert valley spotted with Spanish-era missions. Home to 20,000 people, 97 percent of whom are Hispanic, one would expect the city to be ground zero for impassioned demonstrations against SB 1070, the controversial immigration-enforcement law signed by Gov. Jan Brewer three weeks ago. But for the largely immigrant community here, the prevailing sentiment is one of resignation -- and fear for those relatives and friends who are here illegally.

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