Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor. Her Twitter is @gurleygg, and her email is ggurley@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Clinton and Sanders Infrastructure Platforms Go Nowhere Fast

Ambitious but necessary spending plans are likely to meet corporate and congressional resistance.

(Photo: AP/Tom Lynn)
(Photo: AP/Tom Lynn) Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton walk on stage before the February 11 debate in Milwaukee. W hen the nation’s top infrastructure analysts calculate the cost of the coast-to-coast investments that the United States needs to make in the country’s highways, bridges, dams, mass transit, and water networks, they end up with a number that few minds can grasp. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) recently issued its quadrennial rundown on the state of the country’s infrastructure. It is a sobering list of dollar signs. To get the country’s drinking water pipes in good working order could cost more than $1 trillion; “high hazard” dam repairs, $21 billion; major urban highways upgrades, $170 billion; deficient bridge replacements, $76 billion. Adding in mass transit, wastewater, hazardous waste disposal, aviation, and other demands means that the U.S. would have to spend an estimated $3.6 trillion by 2020 just to get...

Heading Down the Wrong Track on Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor

Congress's refusal to provide sufficient funding has pitted the nation's passenger rail network against state agencies.

(Photo: AP/Mike Groll)
(Photo: AP/Mike Groll) A man works on a rail bridge spanning the Hudson River as an Amtrak passenger rail passes by in December 2015 in Albany, New York. L ast fall, Amtrak implemented a new “cost-sharing policy” that significantly bumps up payments that some state transit agencies in the Northeast make to the national railroad network. The new policy aims to funnel additional funds into North America’s busiest regional passenger rail network—Amtrak’s Boston-to-Washington corridor—which is sorely in need of fresh infusions of cash to make up for decades of infrastructure disinvestment. But the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA), the agency that runs the metro Boston public transportation system, cried foul when Amtrak presented it with a nearly $30 million bill for its yearly share. In a January letter to outgoing Amtrak president Joseph Boardman, Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation Stephanie Pollack called Amtrak’s demands “unreasonable” and pointed to the long-term...

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