Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor. Her Twitter is @gurleygg, and her email is ggurley@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Election Protection: Keeping Calm and Carrying On

As Trump encourages intimidation at the polls, a nationwide coalition of voting rights advocates aims to fight back.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci
AP Photo/Evan Vucci People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, February 27, 2013, to listen to oral arguments in the Shelby v. Holder voting rights case. D onald Trump has not only challenged the legitimacy of the upcoming presidential election, he has challenged many citizens’ right to vote. In one stump speech after another, he’s called on his supporters, in the name of suppressing all-but-nonexistent voter fraud, to go into cities like Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis to eyeball—and if all goes well, intimidate—African American voters at the polls. He’s put Mike Roman, a Republican political operative best known for dialing up fears about the tiny fringe group New Black Panthers during the 2008 election, in charge of his “election protection” effort. But Trump’s threat to voting has galvanized state and local election officials and voting advocates across the political spectrum in a pushback against the most serious voter intimidation effort that...

Massachusetts Charter School Debate Could Turn on Funding

A ballot initiative to expand charters in the Bay State may put fiscal pressure on cash-strapped municipalities.

AP Photo/The Christian Science Monitor, Ann Hermes
AP Photo/The Christian Science Monitor, Ann Hermes Boston Collegiate Charter High School algebra teacher, Arielle Zern, reviews for a test with freshmen on June 16, 2014 in Dorchester, Massachusetts. I n a few weeks, Massachusetts voters will weigh on whether to open more charter schools. Debate on the measure is fierce, as one might expect in a state known for its superior public education system. The pros and cons of charters have been thoroughly hashed and rehashed, but the discussion about how to pay for these new schools, should the question pass, can’t be heard above the siren song of school choice. But fiscal reality bites: The Bay State strains to finance the schools it has, much less batches of new ones. Many local leaders continue to fret about what might happen to their municipal bottom lines if the “Question 2” ballot initiative passes. And they should. The initiative proposes to allow state education officials to approve up to 12 new charters or the expansion of existing...

Recreational Marijuana Ballot Measures Usher In Next Phase in Drug War

With five states poised to vote on legalizing pot, millennials and minority groups are key voting blocs.

(Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)
(Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli) An opponent of California's Proposition 64 holds signs during a rally at the Capitol in Sacramento on October 4. T he five recreational marijuana ballot initiatives that go before voters next month send the clearest signals yet that the country’s ill-fated drug war has entered a new and potentially decisive phase. Legalization questions appear on ballots in five states: Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. Recent polls indicate that the measures are leading in all five states, ranging from a high of 60 percent of voters supporting legalization in California (with 36 percent opposed and 4 percent undecided) to 50 percent in Arizona (with 40 percent opposed and 9 percent undecided). But the prospects for passage or defeat will rest with three key groups: millennials, African Americans, and Latinos. Not surprisingly, individual state polls show that young people are the strongest supporters for legalization. In Massachusetts, 81 percent of...

Flying into Transportation Disruption

If you thought drones and self-driving cars were a challenge, just think of the mess regulators will face when driverless flying cars arrive on the scene.

Day Donaldson/Creative Commons
Day Donaldson/Creative Commons An artistic rendering of the TF-X, an autonomous flying car currently in development by Boston-based firm Terrafugia. O nce the stuff of cartoons and science fiction, flying cars—with or without drivers—may hit the market sooner than anyone is ready for them. Federal officials already have trouble keeping pace with autonomous technologies like drones and driverless vehicles. But self-driving flying vehicles threaten to widen the chasm between innovation and regulatory policy. Technology has long outpaced regulation in transportation, as in many other arenas. Drones, also known as unmanned aerial systems, began attracting widespread consumer interest only in recent years, but the Federal Aviation Administration did not promulgate drone rules until this summer. More than 30 states have statutes covering drone operations, but privacy, security, and safety remain public concerns. Now that North Dakota has become the first state to authorize drones for law...

Trump’s Agenda: A Recipe for Civil Unrest

Donald Trump's recent remarks highlight the candidate’s bigotry, but also signal a grim future for African Americans should he be elected.

AP Photo/ Evan Vucci
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to the Pastors Leadership Conference at New Spirit Revival Center, Wednesday, September 21, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio. D onald Trump finally got around to demonizing African Americans. The only surprise is how long he took to get there. Early in the campaign season, he raged about Muslims and demanded they be barred from entering the country. He labeled Mexican immigrants “rapists.” He has insisted that a wall, built by the United States, paid for by Mexico, must rise along the southern border. But he held off on making broad, baseless generalizations about black people. African Americans listened carefully to Trump’s rhetoric about Muslims and Mexicans: His horrendous poll numbers among blacks reflect a widespread understanding that nothing good can come of a Trump presidency. “We got the message and he wasn’t even talking about us,” U.S. Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton, a District of Columbia Democrat,...

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