Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor.

Recent Articles

Long Lines and Disasters: The TSA in a Time of Troubles

A conversation with former Homeland Security Assistant Secretary Juliette Kayyem on the future of airport security.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren TSA agents check passenger boarding passes and identification at a security screening checkpoint, Thursday, May 19, 2016, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The Transportation Security Administration is a perennial punching bag for air travelers, members of Congress, and municipal officials from coast to coast. However, the disappearance of EgyptAir Flight 804 en route to Cairo from Paris puts the ongoing furor over the long waits at TSA security checkpoints into a different perspective. “The [TSA’s] priority is security, it is not ease of travel,” says Juliette Kayyem, a former Homeland Security assistant secretary and currently an emergency management and national security lecturer at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. The EgyptAir tragedy comes at a time when public frustration with the TSA has been mounting. Last week, U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson warned that passengers could expect even longer waits during the summer travel season...

The Wrath of Khan

The newly elected mayor of London has some choice words for Donald Trump and the presumptive GOP nominee's brand of Islamophobia.

(Photo: Rex Features via AP)
(Photo: Rex Features via AP) Sadiq Khan, the newly elected mayor of London, arrives at City Hall on his first day at work on May 9. S adiq Khan, London’s recently elected mayor, is eager to build trans-Atlantic urban partnerships. An energetic fan of great cities around the world, Khan has expressed admiration for such stateside peers as New York’s Bill de Blasio and Houston’s Annise Parker. He’s also impressed his American counterparts. The U.S. Conference of Mayors is so enthusiastic about the 45-year-old former minister of transport that the group invited him to give a keynote address at its annual conference this summer. In a normal year, the winner of the London mayor’s race would have gone unnoticed by the vast majority of Americans. But Khan, who ran under the Labour Party banner, has just become the first Muslim mayor of London, and he has also plunged headlong into a war of words with Donald Trump, deftly setting up the presumptive Republican nominee for his first major...

Can the Feds Get Washington’s Metro Right?

The D.C. Metro system is in crisis, and a power struggle between federal agencies fighting for the right to oversee safety isn’t helping.

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP Images
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP Images A Metro trains stops at the Capitol South station on Friday, May 6, 2016. T he D.C. Metro system is in crisis, and a power struggle between federal agencies fighting for the right to oversee safety isn’t helping. Washington Area Metro Transit Authority General Manager Paul Wiedefeld’s decision to shut down portions of the system for massive repairs comes in the wake of continued infighting between federal agencies over which one of them should bring the hammer down on the hapless, accident-prone subway system. The partial shutdown will slow train travel so that work crews may expedite repairs after a troubling series of fires and other incidents. The imbroglio has its origins, in part, in the inability of the Obama administration and its predecessors to persuade Republicans on Capitol Hill to step up and provide more funding for the authority’s long-overdue maintenance and repairs. Metro, like most of the country’s big-city transit agencies, has a...

Kildee: Michigan Austerity Policies Doomed Flint

Anti-government mania is to blame for the city’s contaminated-water crisis, says Flint’s congressional representative.

(Photo: AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
(Photo: AP/Manuel Balce Ceneta) Representative Daniel Kildee of Michigan speaks to reporters about the Flint, Michigan, lead poisoning during a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, April 20. T he contaminated-water crisis in Flint, Michigan, has propelled the city from a public relations disaster to municipal freefall. As President Obama prepared to travel next week to a city where residents still don’t trust their tap water, Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette filed criminal charges against two state officials and one city employee who monitored Flint’s water supply. Meanwhile, despite a national uproar and a declared public health emergency, Congress has been slow to provide emergency aid to the poor and predominately African American city. This week, one of the city’s most outspoken leaders, U.S. Representative Dan Kildee, the Democrat who represents Michigan’s Fifth District, once again called on Congress to come up with a federal aid package . The two-term...

Can Cities and States “Clawback” Their Economic Development Advantages?

Boston and Massachusetts have persuaded General Electric to move by pledging multimillion-dollar subsidies. But ensuring a return on the investment will be the hard part.

(Photo: AP/Steven Senne)
(Photo: AP/Steven Senne) Protesters hold signs outside a news conference held by General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, and Boston Mayor Marty Walsh on April 4, 2016. The demonstration was protesting the millions of dollars in tax breaks used to lure GE to Boston. C an General Electric deliver 800 jobs to the greater Boston economy? That is one question that will consume local economic developers in the wake of the Fortune 500 leviathan’s surprising decision to move its corporate headquarters from Connecticut to Massachusetts. In the course of wooing GE, Boston pledged up to $25 million in city property-tax concessions, and the state and the city together pledged more than $250 million in various other subsidies, to persuade the corporation to relocate. Having the GE HQ in Boston, they hope, will pay bigger dividends down the road. But some deals don’t, and there often is little recourse for the cities and states that have laid out taxpayer dollars...

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