Greg Sargent

Recent Articles

TIMES AND POST...

TIMES AND POST PART WAYS ON BUSH'S PRIVATE SESSIONS. Did anyone else notice something intriguing about The Washington Post 's article today -- flagged below by Garance -- about President Bush 's private off-the-record sessions with reporters? The Post obviously viewed the president's campaign as newsworthy -- after all, they wrote a story about it. At the same time, though, The Post reporters who first knew about the sessions -- the ones that were invited -- were constrained from talking about them. So Post reporter Charles Babington went to outside sources to get a story that his newsroom colleagues already knew about. From The Post : White House officials said they also hoped the meetings' mere existence would remain under wraps. That proved impossible when journalists from The Post who were not participants in the session, as well as those at other publications, learned of the meetings from sources outside the paper and began to report on them. Does that strike others as a bit...

STEPHEN SPRUIELL LAPS...

STEPHEN SPRUIELL LAPS UP DEBORAH HOWELL'S LATEST SELF-CONTRADICTION. Incredibly, Stephen Spruiell is still trying -- and still failing -- to discredit the notion that Washingtonpost.com's hiring of Ben Domenech was a sop to the right. Now he says he emailed Deborah Howell and asked her to explain the discrepancy between two statements. First, her column of Dec. 11, in which she wrote that Jim Brady was considering "supplementing" Dan Froomkin 's column with a "conservative blogger." And second, Brady's own statement two days later that "the desire to bring on a conservative blogger has never been related to Dan." According to Spruiell, Howell has now contradicted her earlier version, emailing him the following: Jim Brady said today that he will look for someone who has more journalistic qualifications next time. Froomkin and Morley are both liberals and he is looking for a conservative voice as well. I don't think it has anything to do with Froomkin, but more wanting a lot of voices...

Freddy Hits Back

“There was a time when I thought I could win,” Fernando Ferrer is saying. “It was immediately after the primary. Sense of momentum. Our own internal polls had led me to believe it. The very quick coming together of the Democratic Party … .” A few moments later, he adds: “It felt very good.” Ferrer is sitting at his dining room table in the Bronx neighborhood of Riverdale. He was once the city's Great Latino Hope; a career politician whose rise mirrored the growth of the city's Hispanic community into a major ethnic bloc alongside blacks, Jews, and Italians, among others; a one-time shoe-shine boy who was expected to make history by becoming the city's first Puerto Rican mayor. But now he's alone, save for a reporter, his wife Aramina, who's carefully watching him speak, and his dog, Winston Churchill, who's far more preoccupied with getting taken for a walk than with his owner's barely-concealed swings of emotion. Ferrer has invited the Prospect here for his first extensive interview...

Lacking Discretion

What do Bernard Kerik and Michael Chertoff have in common? Both have proven to be disastrous choices to head the Department of Homeland Security. But that's not the only thing they share. Both were enthusiastically championed for this all-important post by Rudolph Giuliani. As it happens, Giuliani was largely responsible for putting each man on the political map and helping launch their careers. Kerik was once Giuliani's driver. Giuliani subsequently made him his city corrections chief and eventually his top cop. Kerik's 2004 nomination as Homeland Security chief was aggressively pushed by Giuliani, which helped persuade Bush to take a flyer on nominating him. We all remember how well that turned out. Kerik's nomination promptly imploded after a host of ethical and financial problems surfaced, and Giuliani subsequently had to apologize to the president. Chertoff, too, owes a great deal to Giuliani. When the former mayor was U.S. Attorney in the 1980s, he hired Chertoff as a prosecutor...

Dems Don't Know Jack

A new and extensive analysis of campaign donations from all of Jack Abramoff's tribal clients, done by a nonpartisan research firm, shows that a great majority of contributions made by those clients went to Republicans. The analysis undercuts the claim that Abramoff directed sums to Democrats at anywhere near the same rate. The analysis, which was commissioned by The American Prospect and completed on Jan. 25, was done by Dwight L. Morris and Associates, a for-profit firm specializing in campaign finance that has done research for many media outlets. In the weeks since Abramoff confessed to defrauding tribes and enticing public officials with bribes, the question of whether Abramoff directed donations just to Republicans, or to the GOP and Democrats, has been central to efforts by both parties to distance themselves from the unfolding scandal. President Bush recently addressed the question on Fox News, saying: “It seems to me that he [Abramoff] was an equal money dispenser, that he...

Pages