Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the executive editor of The American ProspectHis email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

JOBS FOR JOE.

JOBS FOR JOE. Mark Schmitt �s right-on observation that the Democrats need to find some graceful way to ease Joe Lieberman out of the race should get us all thinking about some suitable, dignified alternative careers for Connecticut�s junior senator. Herewith, some modest proposals: A Lieberman-McKinney Vaudeville Act. Yesterday�s losers make omelets of their broken careers by devising a sketch that can be performed in almost any venue with a minimum of costly scenery. It would go something as follows: Lieberman starts, lecturing the audience with a moral homily. Then McKinney pops him one. Curtain. After Larry Summers. Robert Rubin rigs it so that Joe can become the next president of Harvard. Lieberman proves expert at schmoozing donors, but causes controversy when he calls Cornel West to berate him for giving A�s to too many of his pupils, and West responds by telling Lieberman that he teaches at Princeton. Publisher of The New Republic . Lieberman takes the helm at the venerable...

Say That You'll Go, Joe

With the release yesterday of the latest Quinnipiac Poll, which shows Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman trailing challenger Ned Lamont in next Tuesday's Democratic primary by a prohibitive 54 percent to 41 percent margin, we now have some hard numbers to add to what's been the growing impression of many political observers for the past several weeks: Joe Lieberman isn't just going to lose the election, he's going to get clobbered. Joementum is running backwards in Connecticut. When Quinnipiac polled in early June, Lieberman held a 15 point edge. In its poll of July 20, however, Lamont had pulled into a four-point lead. Now, he's up by 14. Which, as events would have it, is the identical figure as the percentage of voters who say they haven't yet made up their minds. Most Connecticut Democrats have made their choice, which is against the war in Iraq and, accordingly, against Joe Lieberman. The voters rejecting Lieberman are nothing if not principled. It's not that they personally...

Do Nothing, Please

Democratic Senate leader Harry Reid has taken to invoking Harry Truman's line about a "do-nothing Congress," and with ample reason. In dealing with the major issues of our time (global warming, immigration, the diminishing benefits and stagnant wages that characterize today's economy) or in discharging its oversight duties over administration policies that have failed (the war in Iraq) or were stillborn (the rescue of New Orleans), the Republican-controlled Congress has been nowhere to be found. In inverse relation to the seriousness of the challenges that America confronts, this Congress is well on its way to spending the fewest days in session of any in modern memory. Still, the one thing that should engender more fear than the current Congress's doing nothing is the current Congress's doing something. Every time congressional Republicans are compelled by public pressure to address a serious issue, they retreat to their laboratory and emerge with Frankenstein-monster legislation...

Put Up or Shut Up

In the Middle East, it is suddenly the European moment. Israel knows it cannot eliminate Hezbollah through force of arms, and it has realized that occupying hostile terrain is too much of a drain on its physical, political and moral resources. Reversing long-standing policy, it now is calling for an international force to secure its borders. But which nations' troops should make up that force? The United States, even if it weren't bogged down in Iraq, is too closely identified with Israel. The Sunni Arab states that might conceivably step forward -- Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia -- would risk an eruption of rage in their streets, and their intervention could also move the entire region closer to a Sunni-Shiite conflagration. All this puts the ball squarely in Europe's court. And if Europe wants to be taken seriously on the world stage, this is an opportunity it should welcome. The nations of Western Europe, after all, have long, and rightly, called for an end to Israel's occupation of...

The Guns of July

I wonder if this is how the summer of 1914 felt. Then, you will recall, the assassination of the Austrian archduke by a Serbian nationalist terrorist provided the senescent Austro-Hungarian Empire the excuse it had been looking for to wipe out the Serbian nationalists, which provoked the pan-Slavic nationalists at work for the czar to threaten the Austro-Hungarians with destruction, which led Germany's Kaiser to pledge retaliatory war against Russia, which prompted the French, who had an anti-German alliance with Russia, to begin mobilization. . . . Nobody wanted global conflagration, yet nobody knew how to stop it, and the American president (Woodrow Wilson, who was not yet a Wilsonian) did nothing to help avert the coming war. Within a month, the war came, and it took the remainder of the 20th century for the world to fully recover. I review this familiar history for those of us (myself included) who've been wondering how the kidnapping of three Israeli soldiers (and the killing of...

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