Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the editor-at-large at The American Prospect and a columnist for The Washington Post. His email is hmeyerson@prospect.org

Recent Articles

The Man Who Wasn't There

The specter that Dick Cheney wants stalking the consciousness of Americans as they go to vote is the threat of a nuclear or chemical weapon being smuggled into the center of an American city. He called up that image twice last night, and he surely wants Americans to believe that if terrorists are about to set off the big one, he will throw himself upon it and, with his imposing bulk, his dubious numbers, his concocted realities, and the sheer weight of his alarmism, do a far better job of absorbing the blast than the lightweight John Edwards ever could. Or, for that matter, than George W. Bush ever could. The president was the man who wasn't there in last night's debate. Cheney attacked John Kerry. Edwards defended Kerry. Edwards attacked the administration, and Cheney defended it, but the president himself -- that floundering, surly nincompoop whom we saw last week -- barely came up. It wouldn't have done the Bush-Cheney ticket any good to remind people of Bush himself, and the veep...

The Clear Candidate

“They can run but they can't hide,” the great heavyweight champ Joe Louis used to say of his hapless opponents, but up until last night, George W. Bush was doing a pretty fair job of both running and hiding. Indeed, to a considerable degree, he was running ahead because Karl Rove had hidden him from any possible confrontation with critics -- and with the truth. In accordance with the mandates of the Bush campaign, none but the faithful attend his rallies. In accordance with the mandates of the Kerry campaign, no one at the Democratic Convention had said anything seriously untoward about the president's performance in office. And while our economy has been rotting from within and Iraq has descended into an almost routine savagery, the media have blown their precious few opportunities to question the president about the disaster that is his term in office. So the president was tough because he and his minions said he was; we were succeeding on all fronts because he and his minions said...

How Republicans Define Security

Election Day approaches, which means it is time for House Republicans to run fully amok. Today, the House will take up a bill by Indiana Republican Mark Souder to lift the gun controls in the District of Columbia. Souder's bill legalizes ownership of semiautomatic weapons and armor-piercing ammunition. How this would increase security around the White House and the Capitol is something that Souder and Co. have neglected to explain, but no matter. The House Republican leadership knows the bill won't pass the Senate. The only reason it was even introduced was to force House Democrats -- a number of whom represent gun-loving districts -- to vote on this nonsense. Also today, five House committees take up Speaker Dennis Hastert's bill to reform the U.S. intelligence community. House Democrats were kept in the dark on the contents of the bill until it emerged fully grown from Hastert's office late last week. By contrast, the bill being considered in the Senate is the result of extensive...

Blocking the Latino Ballot

To an immigrant, Arnold Schwarzenegger told delegates at the Republican convention last month, there is no country "more welcoming than the United States of America." And most of the time, that's true. But it wasn't true last week in Miami Beach, where the Department of Homeland Security attempted to ban a nonpartisan voter registration operation from setting up tables on the sidewalk outside a massive naturalization ceremony at that city's convention center. The DHS complained that Mi Familia Vota would be blocking the doors at the swearing-in. But last Thursday, U.S. District Judge Adalberto Jordan ruled that the right to register voters was protected by the First Amendment, though he did stipulate how much space the group's tables could take up. If that arrangement seems to you the kind of compromise that Mi Familia Vota and the DHS could have arrived at themselves without making a literal federal case out of it, you underestimate the Bush administration's aversion to voting by new...

Buckeye Blues

LORAIN, OHIO -- The Steelworkers hall here is a musty monument to American labor's glorious past. On the walls are photos of Franklin Roosevelt signing the Wagner Act in 1935, and of Philip Murray, president of the United Steelworkers of America from its inception in 1937 until his death in 1952. Newer images are nowhere to be found, and the hall itself, while functional, is cheerless and stark. And what's to cheer? In this corner of northern Ohio, about 40 miles west of Cleveland, the factories that once employed thousands of workers are almost entirely gone. On an August afternoon, I'm meeting with union leaders from across Lorain County, each with his own mournful numbers. Tim Donovan, president of the United Auto Workers local that represents the local Ford plants, says that they now employ 2,100 workers, down from 10,000 a decade ago. The Steelworkers local represented the workers at a United States Steel plant that employed 20,000 in the 1970s; today, that workforce has shrunk...

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