Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the editor-at-large at The American Prospect and a columnist for The Washington Post. His email is hmeyerson@prospect.org

Recent Articles

A Global Vision for Labor

He may not have been entirely happy about it, but on Monday, Andy Stern had his John L. Lewis moment. Addressing roughly 3,000 delegates at the quadrennial convention of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Stern, who's been the SEIU's president since 1996, certainly had plenty to be happy about. While the vast majority of American unions have been shrinking or barely holding their own, the SEIU on Stern's watch has nearly doubled in size, to 1.6 million members, which makes it much the largest on the continent. In the Northeast, the Midwest, and on the Pacific Coast, it has won decent wages and health care benefits not just for public employees but for janitors, hospital orderlies, and nursing home workers who would otherwise be making the minimum wage and seeing doctors only in emergency rooms. With the rate of private-sector unionization having dwindled to a minuscule 8 percent, however, the SEIU is really no more than a unionized island in a non-union sea. And the...

Estelle at 90

My mother's trouble with dubious authority goes back at least as far as her one-girl crusade on behalf of Abraham Lincoln. The authorities she antagonized on Abe's behalf were her history teachers at her Nashville junior high school, back in the late 1920s. "Some of them were Confederate war widows," she says. "All of them were old biddies. And they said horrible things about Lincoln." In response, young Miss Estelle Rothstein dared to point out that Lincoln was a hero up North, at least in New York, which her family would visit every summer in their trusty Model T. (According to family legend, this was the car in which mushrooms mysteriously took root and grew on the floor of the back seat). What's more, she continued recklessly, Lincoln had been right to abolish slavery. This was not what her teachers considered a helpful intervention. It came as no surprise, then, when she lammed out of Nashville shortly after finishing high school and hightailed it to New York. To this day I don't...

Class Warrior

Ronald Reagan changed America, and -- with all due deference to his dedication to principle, his indomitable spirit, his affability -- not for the better. Historians will argue how much credit Reagan deserves for the ratcheting down of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union. By any measure he surely merits some, even if he spent the better part of his presidency ratcheting the Cold War up. But however much Reagan helped wind down the Cold War abroad, he absolutely revived class war here at home. Slashing taxes on the rich, refusing to raise the minimum wage and declaring war on unions by firing air traffic controllers during their 1981 strike, Reagan took aim at the New Deal's proudest creation: a secure and decently paid working class. Broadly shared prosperity was out; plutocracy was dug up from the boneyard of bad ideas. The share of the nation's wealth held by the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans rose by 5 percent during Reagan's presidency, while virtually everyone...

Pomp and Stingy Circumstance

Suddenly "Pomp and Circumstance" was booming out of the Zellerbach Auditorium sound system and there she was -- my daughter Miranda, that short blonde in the front row (no mere mortarboard could obscure those locks) as the orchestra section filled up with hundreds of graduating University of California history majors last Friday morning. And just as suddenly, but not in the least surprisingly, I was overwhelmed by every stereotypical parental emotion: How had that erstwhile little munchkin become this terrific young woman? How had she grown so supremely capable at a whole range of things that neither her mother nor I could do if our lives depended on it? And -- inevitably -- where had the time gone? It was a marvelous, poignant morning, and I wish the same for every parent of every student in California. Unfortunately, fewer parents and students will have the opportunity that we had last week in Berkeley, and therein hangs a tale of myopic university administrators, internal...

Death of a Salesman

"Nobody dast blame this man," says Charley in a spontaneous eulogy for his neighbor, Willy Loman, in the concluding scene of Arthur Miller's tragedy. "A salesman is got to dream, boy." And certainly nobody blames Nicholas Berg, beheaded in Iraq by ghouls from the Dark Ages. Berg had his dreams, and they weren't just of business opportunities in Iraq. Though just 26, Berg was already something of a globetrotter in the cause of building a better world. Working through the American Jewish World Service, he'd gone to Kenya to help construct a water access project -- the kind of project that Africa needs most, and for which Berg's idealism, engineering skills and evident affability suited him to a tee. Ruth Messinger, the former Manhattan borough president and a practical idealist who knows one when she sees one, called Berg "an unbelievable person -- highly skilled, highly humanitarian." But what on earth possessed Berg to venture off to Iraq by himself to maintain and repair radio...

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